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In F# operator overloading seems powerful but also tricky to get right. I have following class:

 type Value<'T> = 
    with
        static member inline  (+) (a : Value<'U>, b: Value<'U>) : Value<'U> = 
           do stuff

If i define another overload for + with :

static member inline  (+) (a : Value<'U>, b: 'U) : Value<'U> = 
           do stuff

It works. But if i want a symmetric operator:

static member inline  (+) (b: 'U, a : Value<'U>) : Value<'U> = 
           do stuff

The compiler complains:

let a = Value<int>(2);
let b = a + 3 // ok
let c = 3 + a //<-- error here

Error 3 Type inference problem too complicated (maximum iteration depth reached). Consider adding further type annotations

Is there a way around this and stay generic?

I am using F# 3.1

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

The compiler never has a choice: When you apply the (+) operator, you either give it something of type int or something of type Value<'U>. Something of type int cannot be considered of type Value<'U>, and vice versa.

Let's try this in the interpreter. I made the two implementations output A and B so we can tell which is being called:

> type Value<'T> = 
-       { a : 'T  }
-     with
-         static member inline (+) (a : Value<'U>, b: Value<'U>) : Value<'U> = 
-            printfn "A"; a
-         static member inline (+) (a : Value<'U>, b: int) : Value<'U> = 
-            printfn "B"; a
- ;;

type Value<'T> =
  {a: 'T;}
  with
    static member ( + ) : a:Value<'U> * b:Value<'U> -> Value<'U>
    static member ( + ) : a:Value<'U> * b:int -> Value<'U>
  end

Now we have a type. Let's make a value of it.

> let t = { a = "foo" };;

val t : Value<string> = {a = "foo";}

We can now try the overloads. First int:

> t + 4;;
B
val it : Value<string> = {a = "foo";}

Ok. Now Value<string>:

> t + t;;
A
val it : Value<string> = {a = "foo";}
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Actually i will rephrase the question, because i asked it wrong. Thank for answering –  Liviu Mar 13 at 13:15

As stated in another answer, my preferred solution would be to use a base class for some overloads:

type BaseValue<'T>(v : 'T) =
    member x.V = v

type Value<'T>(v : 'T) =
    inherit BaseValue<'T>(v : 'T)
    static member inline  (+) (a : Value<_>, b: Value<_>) = Value(b.V+a.V)

type BaseValue with
    static member inline  (+) (a: BaseValue<_>, b) = Value(b+a.V)
    static member inline  (+) (b, a: BaseValue<_>) = Value(b+a.V)


// test
let v = Value(2)
let a = v + v
let b = v + 3
let c = 3 + v
let d = Value(Value 7) + Value(Value 10)
let e = 5 + 7
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Note that this problem disappears if you use the same type argument on your members as you do on the class itself:

type Value<'t when 't : (static member (+) : 't * 't -> 't)> = V of 't with
    static member inline (+)(V(x:'t), V(y:'t)) : Value<'t> = V(x+y)
    static member inline (+)(V(x:'t), y:'t)    : Value<'t> = V(x+y)
    static member inline (+)(x:'t,    V(y:'t)) : Value<'t> = V(x+y)

This means that you can't create instances of type Value<obj> any more, but might meet your needs.

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