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So this is a part of my class

this.$e = function(el){
    element = document.querySelector( el );
    return {
        method1 : function(){
            element.className += " class1";
            return this;
        },
        method2 : function(){
            element.className += " class2";
            return this;
        }
    }
}

And this one works perfectly to use it as such

$e(".myClass").method1().method2();

Now I wanna go a step further and add those methods to the prototype of the function.

I basically have no idea how.

I want it to look something like this

this.$e = function(el){
    element = document.querySelector( el );
    return element;
}

this.$e.prototype = {
    method1 : function(){
        this.element.className += " class1";
        return this;
    },
    method2 : function(){
        this.element.className += " class2";
        return this;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
How do you construct these objects? –  Renato Zannon Mar 12 at 23:28
    
@RenatoZannon What do you mean by construct? –  albxn Mar 12 at 23:37
    
How do you create them? Do you have a constructor function? –  Renato Zannon Mar 12 at 23:38
    
@RenatoZannon Yes, they're inside of an object. It's just a function myFunction(){ this.$e = ... }. I want to use them inside this function, though. –  albxn Mar 12 at 23:42
    
Why do you add $e to this? –  Renato Zannon Mar 12 at 23:46

1 Answer 1

I suggest hoisting $e out of your constructor function:

function myFunction() {
  this.$e = function(el) {
    return new $E(el);
  };

  /* ... */
}

function $E(el) {
  this.element = document.querySelector( el );
}

$E.prototype.method1 = function() {
  this.element.className += " class1";
  return this;
};

$E.prototype.method2 = function() {
  this.element.className += " class2";
  return this;
};
share|improve this answer
    
No need to return this in an instance method –  Johan Mar 12 at 23:56
    
The return this is to fulfill the chaining requirement. Otherwise, method1 and method2 would return undefined. –  Renato Zannon Mar 13 at 0:05
    
Oh didn't notice the chaining. My bad –  Johan Mar 13 at 0:18

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