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I have scenario where i have got tables (in propriety datastore) with thousands of columns. The tables before being exported for querying is transformed to narrow format (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_and_Narrow_Data).

I am developing a query executor. The input to this query executor is the narrow tables not the original tables. I want to perform joins on two similar narrow tables, but cannot figure out the exact general logic behind it.

For example lets say we have two table R and S in the original format(wide format)

Table R
C1  C2  C3  R1  R2  R3
5   6   7   1234    4552    12532
5   6   8   4512    21523   434
15  16  17  1254    1212    3576

Table S
C1  C2  C3  S1  S2  S3
5   6   7   5412    35112   3512
5   6   8   125393  1523    6749
15  16  17  74397   4311    1153

C1, C2, C3 are the common columns between the tables.

The narrow table for table R is

C1  C2  C3  Key Value
5   6   7   R1  1234
            R2  4552
            R3  12532
5   6   8   R1  4512
            R2  21523
            R3  434
15  16  17  R1  1254
            R2  1212
            R3  3576 

The narrow table for table S is

C1  C2  C3  Key Value
5   6   7   S1  5412
            S2  35112
            S3  3512
5   6   8   S1  125393
            S2  1523
            S3  6749
15  16  17  S1  74397
            S2  4311
            S3  1153

Now when i join the original table R and S (on C1, C2 and C3) i get the result

C1  C2  C3  R1  R2  R3  S1  S2  S3
5   6   7   1234    4552    12532   5412    35112   3512
5   6   8   4512    21523   434 125393  1523    6749
15  16  17  1254    1212    3576    74397   4311    1153

Whose narrow format is

C1  C2  C3  Key Value
5   6   7   R1  1234
            R2  4552
            R3  12532
            S1  5412
            S2  35112
            S3  3512
5   6   8   R1  4512
            R2  21523
            R3  434
            S1  125393
            S2  1523
            S3  6749
15  16  17  R1  1254
            R2  1212
            R3  3576
            S1  74397
            S2  4311
            S3  1153

How can i get the above table by just joining the narrow tables (on the common columns) that i got as input. If you use normal tabular join (natural joing, outer join etc) between the two narrow tables you will get an exploded table because each key on table R gets multiplied with all the keys in table S.

I am not using SQL, or postgres or any database system. I am looking for the answer in terms of algorithms or relational algebraic expressions.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're looking for the set union operator: A∪B is defined as the set of all tuples that appear in A, B or both, supposing the two relations have the same schema. The narrow tables all have the same schema (id, key, value), so they're perfectly union compatible.

And I have proof:

Suppose we have relations A(id, val1, val2 ... val_n) and B(id, val_n+1 ... val_n+m). We will also need a relation holding our variable names V(variable) = {('val1'), ('val2') ... ('val_n+m')}. The narrow-format equivalent of A is A'(id, variable, value), which we can construct like this:

\bigcup_{i=1}^{n}  \rho_{value/val_i}( \pi_{id, val_i}(A) ) \times  \sigma_{variable="val_i"}(V)

That is, for each value we project A to (id, val_i), rename val_i to "value", put the variable name in the table (by taking the cross product with a single tuple in V); then we take the union of all these relations. Let us also construct B'(id, variable, value) in a similar fashion.

The natural join can be defined using only primitives:

A \Join B = \pi_{id, val_1 ... val_{n+m}} ( \sigma_{id = x} ( A \times \rho_{x/id}(B) ) )

Therefore we can construct (A ⋈ B)' like this (having combined the projections):

\bigcup_{i=1}^{n+m}  \rho_{value/val_i}( \pi_{id, val_i}( \sigma_{id = x} ( A \times \rho_{x/id}(B) ) ) ) \times  \sigma_{variable="val_i"}(V)

Let's apply the projection earlier:

\bigcup_{i=1}^{n+m}  \rho_{value/val_i}( \pi_{id, val_i}( \sigma_{id = x} ( \pi_{id, val_i}(A) \times \rho_{x/id}(\pi_{id, val_i}(B))) ) ) \times  \sigma_{variable="val_i"}(V)

But a val_i can only appear in A or B, not both, making one term of the cross product zero half of the time so this can be reduced and re-ordered into

\bigcup_{i=1}^{n}  \rho_{value/val_i}( \pi_{id, val_i}(A)) \times  \sigma_{variable="val_i"}(V) \cup \bigcup_{i=n+1}^{m}  \rho_{value/val_i}( \pi_{id, val_i}(B)) \times  \sigma_{variable="val_i"}(V)

which is exactly A' U B'.

So, we have shown that (A ⋈ B)' = A' U B', that is, the narrow format of the joined tables is the union of the narrow format tables.

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really appreciate the effort you took to prove it. I had implemented using Union as you mentioned since that was the only way the result made sense. But I could not get my head around proving that its mathematically correct to do so. –  sushil Jun 26 at 23:05

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