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Given the hash of a blob, is there a way to get a list of commits that have this blob in their tree?

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"Hash of a blob" is that returned by git hash-object or sha1("blob " + filesize + "\0" + data), and not simply the sha1sum of the blob contents. – Ivan Hamilton Mar 16 '15 at 13:23
    
I originally thought this question matched my question, but it seems it does not. I want to know the one commit which first introduced this blob to the repository. – Jesse Glick Sep 25 '15 at 13:23
up vote 61 down vote accepted

Both of the following scripts take the blob’s SHA1 as the first argument, and after it, optionally, any arguments that git log will understand. E.g. --all to search in all branches instead of just the current one, or -g to search in the reflog, or whatever else you fancy.

Here it is as a shell script – short and sweet, but slow:

#!/bin/sh
obj_name="$1"
shift
git log "$@" --pretty=format:'%T %h %s' \
| while read tree commit subject ; do
    if git ls-tree -r $tree | grep -q "$obj_name" ; then
        echo $commit "$subject"
    fi
done

And an optimised version in Perl, still quite short but much faster:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use 5.008;
use strict;
use Memoize;

my $obj_name;

sub check_tree {
    my ( $tree ) = @_;
    my @subtree;

    {
        open my $ls_tree, '-|', git => 'ls-tree' => $tree
            or die "Couldn't open pipe to git-ls-tree: $!\n";

        while ( <$ls_tree> ) {
            /\A[0-7]{6} (\S+) (\S+)/
                or die "unexpected git-ls-tree output";
            return 1 if $2 eq $obj_name;
            push @subtree, $2 if $1 eq 'tree';
        }
    }

    check_tree( $_ ) && return 1 for @subtree;

    return;
}

memoize 'check_tree';

die "usage: git-find-blob <blob> [<git-log arguments ...>]\n"
    if not @ARGV;

my $obj_short = shift @ARGV;
$obj_name = do {
    local $ENV{'OBJ_NAME'} = $obj_short;
     `git rev-parse --verify \$OBJ_NAME`;
} or die "Couldn't parse $obj_short: $!\n";
chomp $obj_name;

open my $log, '-|', git => log => @ARGV, '--pretty=format:%T %h %s'
    or die "Couldn't open pipe to git-log: $!\n";

while ( <$log> ) {
    chomp;
    my ( $tree, $commit, $subject ) = split " ", $_, 3;
    print "$commit $subject\n" if check_tree( $tree );
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice implementation, very Perlic. :) +1 – Greg Hewgill Oct 22 '08 at 9:44
7  
FYI you have to use the full SHA of the blob. A prefix, even if unique, will not work. To get the full SHA from a prefix, you can use git rev-parse --verify $theprefix – John Douthat Aug 2 '11 at 23:05
1  
Thanks @JohnDouthat for this comment. Here's how to incorporate that into above script (sorry for the inlining in comments): my $blob_arg = shift; open my $rev_parse, '-|', git => 'rev-parse' => '--verify', $blob_arg or die "Couldn't open pipe to git-rev-parse: $!\n"; my $obj_name = <$rev_parse>; chomp $obj_name; close $rev_parse or die "Couldn't expand passed blob.\n"; $obj_name eq $blob_arg or print "(full blob is $obj_name)\n"; – Ingo Karkat May 17 '12 at 19:40
2  
This only finds commits on the current branch unless you pass --all as an additional argument. (Finding all commits repo-wide is important in cases like deleting a large file from the repo history). – peterflynn Jul 11 '13 at 5:21
1  
Tip: pass the -g flag to the shell script (after the object ID) to examine the reflog. – Bram Schoenmakers Sep 18 '14 at 7:18

I thought this would be a generally useful thing to have, so I wrote up a little perl script to do it:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;

my @commits;
my %trees;
my $blob;

sub blob_in_tree {
    my $tree = $_[0];
    if (defined $trees{$tree}) {
        return $trees{$tree};
    }
    my $r = 0;
    open(my $f, "git cat-file -p $tree|") or die $!;
    while (<$f>) {
        if (/^\d+ blob (\w+)/ && $1 eq $blob) {
            $r = 1;
        } elsif (/^\d+ tree (\w+)/) {
            $r = blob_in_tree($1);
        }
        last if $r;
    }
    close($f);
    $trees{$tree} = $r;
    return $r;
}

sub handle_commit {
    my $commit = $_[0];
    open(my $f, "git cat-file commit $commit|") or die $!;
    my $tree = <$f>;
    die unless $tree =~ /^tree (\w+)$/;
    if (blob_in_tree($1)) {
        print "$commit\n";
    }
    while (1) {
        my $parent = <$f>;
        last unless $parent =~ /^parent (\w+)$/;
        push @commits, $1;
    }
    close($f);
}

if (!@ARGV) {
    print STDERR "Usage: git-find-blob blob [head ...]\n";
    exit 1;
}

$blob = $ARGV[0];
if (@ARGV > 1) {
    foreach (@ARGV) {
        handle_commit($_);
    }
} else {
    handle_commit("HEAD");
}
while (@commits) {
    handle_commit(pop @commits);
}

I'll put this up on github when I get home this evening.

Update: It looks like somebody already did this. That one uses the same general idea but the details are different and the implementation is much shorter. I don't know which would be faster but performance is probably not a concern here!

Update 2: For what it's worth, my implementation is orders of magnitude faster, especially for a large repository. That git ls-tree -r really hurts.

Update 3: I should note that my performance comments above apply to the implementation I linked above in the first Update. Aristotle's implementation performs comparably to mine. More details in the comments for those who are curious.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, how can it be that much faster? You’re walking the tree anyway, aren’t you? What work does git-ls-tree do that you avoid? (NB.: grep will bail on first match, SIGPIPE’ing the git-ls-tree.) When I tried it, I had to Ctrl-C your script after 30 seconds; mine was done in 4. – Aristotle Pagaltzis Oct 22 '08 at 0:01
1  
My script caches the results of subtrees in the %trees hash, so it doesn't have to keep searching subtrees that haven't changed. – Greg Hewgill Oct 22 '08 at 0:05
    
Actually, I was trying the implementation I found on github that I linked to. Yours is faster in some cases, but it depends highly on whether the file you're looking for is at the beginning or end of the ls-tree list. My repository has 9574 files in it right now. – Greg Hewgill Oct 22 '08 at 0:10
    
It also occurs to me that some nonlinear project histories might cause my script to do much more work than it needs to (this can be fixed). This might be why it took a long time to run for you. My respository is a git-svn mirror of a Subversion repository, so it's nicely linear. – Greg Hewgill Oct 22 '08 at 0:17
    
Instead of parsing cat-file to get the tree just do git rev-parse $commit^{} – jthill Mar 6 '13 at 19:18

While the original question does not ask for it, I think it is useful to also check the staging area to see if a blob is referenced. I modified the original bash script to do this and found what was referencing a corrupt blob in my repository:

#!/bin/sh
obj_name="$1"
shift
git ls-files --stage \
| if grep -q "$obj_name"; then
    echo Found in staging area. Run git ls-files --stage to see.
fi

git log "$@" --pretty=format:'%T %h %s' \
| while read tree commit subject ; do
    if git ls-tree -r $tree | grep -q "$obj_name" ; then
        echo $commit "$subject"
    fi
done
share|improve this answer
2  
I'd just like to give credit where it's due: thank you RAM corruption for causing me a BSOD and forcing me to hand repair my git repo. – Mario Mar 17 '12 at 8:20

Here are the details of a script I polished up as the answer to a similar question, and here you can see it in action:

screenshot of git-ls-dir runs

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So... I needed to find all files over a given limit in a repo over 8GB in size, with over 108,000 revisions. I adapted Aristotle's perl script along with a ruby script I wrote to reach this complete solution.

First, git gc - do this to ensure all objects are in packfiles - we don't scan objects not in pack files.

Next Run this script to locate all blobs over CUTOFF_SIZE bytes. Capture output to a file like "large-blobs.log"

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

require 'log4r'

# The output of git verify-pack -v is:
# SHA1 type size size-in-packfile offset-in-packfile depth base-SHA1
#
#
GIT_PACKS_RELATIVE_PATH=File.join('.git', 'objects', 'pack', '*.pack')

# 10MB cutoff
CUTOFF_SIZE=1024*1024*10
#CUTOFF_SIZE=1024

begin

  include Log4r
  log = Logger.new 'git-find-large-objects'
  log.level = INFO
  log.outputters = Outputter.stdout

  git_dir = %x[ git rev-parse --show-toplevel ].chomp

  if git_dir.empty?
    log.fatal "ERROR: must be run in a git repository"
    exit 1
  end

  log.debug "Git Dir: '#{git_dir}'"

  pack_files = Dir[File.join(git_dir, GIT_PACKS_RELATIVE_PATH)]
  log.debug "Git Packs: #{pack_files.to_s}"

  # For details on this IO, see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1154846/continuously-read-from-stdout-of-external-process-in-ruby
  #
  # Short version is, git verify-pack flushes buffers only on line endings, so
  # this works, if it didn't, then we could get partial lines and be sad.

  types = {
    :blob => 1,
    :tree => 1,
    :commit => 1,
  }


  total_count = 0
  counted_objects = 0
  large_objects = []

  IO.popen("git verify-pack -v -- #{pack_files.join(" ")}") do |pipe|
    pipe.each do |line|
      # The output of git verify-pack -v is:
      # SHA1 type size size-in-packfile offset-in-packfile depth base-SHA1
      data = line.chomp.split(' ')
      # types are blob, tree, or commit
      # we ignore other lines by looking for that
      next unless types[data[1].to_sym] == 1
      log.info "INPUT_THREAD: Processing object #{data[0]} type #{data[1]} size #{data[2]}"
      hash = {
        :sha1 => data[0],
        :type => data[1],
        :size => data[2].to_i,
      }
      total_count += hash[:size]
      counted_objects += 1
      if hash[:size] > CUTOFF_SIZE
        large_objects.push hash
      end
    end
  end

  log.info "Input complete"

  log.info "Counted #{counted_objects} totalling #{total_count} bytes."

  log.info "Sorting"

  large_objects.sort! { |a,b| b[:size] <=> a[:size] }

  log.info "Sorting complete"

  large_objects.each do |obj|
    log.info "#{obj[:sha1]} #{obj[:type]} #{obj[:size]}"
  end

  exit 0
end

Next, edit the file to remove any blobs you don't wait and the INPUT_THREAD bits at the top. once you have only lines for the sha1s you want to find, run the following script like this:

cat edited-large-files.log | cut -d' ' -f4 | xargs git-find-blob | tee large-file-paths.log

Where the git-find-blob script is below.

#!/usr/bin/perl

# taken from: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/223678/which-commit-has-this-blob
# and modified by Carl Myers <cmyers@cmyers.org> to scan multiple blobs at once
# Also, modified to keep the discovered filenames
# vi: ft=perl

use 5.008;
use strict;
use Memoize;
use Data::Dumper;


my $BLOBS = {};

MAIN: {

    memoize 'check_tree';

    die "usage: git-find-blob <blob1> <blob2> ... -- [<git-log arguments ...>]\n"
        if not @ARGV;


    while ( @ARGV && $ARGV[0] ne '--' ) {
        my $arg = $ARGV[0];
        #print "Processing argument $arg\n";
        open my $rev_parse, '-|', git => 'rev-parse' => '--verify', $arg or die "Couldn't open pipe to git-rev-parse: $!\n";
        my $obj_name = <$rev_parse>;
        close $rev_parse or die "Couldn't expand passed blob.\n";
        chomp $obj_name;
        #$obj_name eq $ARGV[0] or print "($ARGV[0] expands to $obj_name)\n";
        print "($arg expands to $obj_name)\n";
        $BLOBS->{$obj_name} = $arg;
        shift @ARGV;
    }
    shift @ARGV; # drop the -- if present

    #print "BLOBS: " . Dumper($BLOBS) . "\n";

    foreach my $blob ( keys %{$BLOBS} ) {
        #print "Printing results for blob $blob:\n";

        open my $log, '-|', git => log => @ARGV, '--pretty=format:%T %h %s'
            or die "Couldn't open pipe to git-log: $!\n";

        while ( <$log> ) {
            chomp;
            my ( $tree, $commit, $subject ) = split " ", $_, 3;
            #print "Checking tree $tree\n";
            my $results = check_tree( $tree );

            #print "RESULTS: " . Dumper($results);
            if (%{$results}) {
                print "$commit $subject\n";
                foreach my $blob ( keys %{$results} ) {
                    print "\t" . (join ", ", @{$results->{$blob}}) . "\n";
                }
            }
        }
    }

}


sub check_tree {
    my ( $tree ) = @_;
    #print "Calculating hits for tree $tree\n";

    my @subtree;

    # results = { BLOB => [ FILENAME1 ] }
    my $results = {};
    {
        open my $ls_tree, '-|', git => 'ls-tree' => $tree
            or die "Couldn't open pipe to git-ls-tree: $!\n";

        # example git ls-tree output:
        # 100644 blob 15d408e386400ee58e8695417fbe0f858f3ed424    filaname.txt
        while ( <$ls_tree> ) {
            /\A[0-7]{6} (\S+) (\S+)\s+(.*)/
                or die "unexpected git-ls-tree output";
            #print "Scanning line '$_' tree $2 file $3\n";
            foreach my $blob ( keys %{$BLOBS} ) {
                if ( $2 eq $blob ) {
                    print "Found $blob in $tree:$3\n";
                    push @{$results->{$blob}}, $3;
                }
            }
            push @subtree, [$2, $3] if $1 eq 'tree';
        }
    }

    foreach my $st ( @subtree ) {
        # $st->[0] is tree, $st->[1] is dirname
        my $st_result = check_tree( $st->[0] );
        foreach my $blob ( keys %{$st_result} ) {
            foreach my $filename ( @{$st_result->{$blob}} ) {
                my $path = $st->[1] . '/' . $filename;
                #print "Generating subdir path $path\n";
                push @{$results->{$blob}}, $path;
            }
        }
    }

    #print "Returning results for tree $tree: " . Dumper($results) . "\n\n";
    return $results;
}

The output will look like this:

<hash prefix> <oneline log message>
    path/to/file.txt
    path/to/file2.txt
    ...
<hash prefix2> <oneline log msg...>

And so on. Every commit which contains a large file in its tree will be listed. if you grep out the lines that start with a tab, and uniq that, you will have a list of all paths you can filter-branch to remove, or you can do something more complicated.

Let me reiterate: this process ran successfully, on a 10GB repo with 108,000 commits. It took much longer than I predicted when running on a large number of blobs though, over 10 hours, I will have to see if the memorize bit is working...

share|improve this answer
1  
Like Aristotle's answer above, this only finds commits on the current branch unless you pass additional arguments: -- --all. (Finding all commits repo-wide is important in cases like thoroughly deleting a large file from the repo history). – peterflynn Jul 11 '13 at 5:26

Unfortunately scripts were a bit slow for me, so I had to optimize a bit. Luckily I had not only the hash but also the path of a file.

git log --all --pretty=format:%H <path> | xargs -n1 -I% sh -c "git ls-tree % <path> | grep -q <hash> && echo %"
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