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Witht the following code

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description="Prepare something code.")
parser.add_argument("-t","--tabular", help="print something in tabular way for EXCEL",
                      action="store_true")
parser.add_argument("-v","--verbose", action="store_true")
args = parser.parse_args()
if args.tabular:
    print "Tabular print"
elif args.verbose:
    print "VERBOSE"

It's only when I execute the following way, that it prints usage:

$ python mycode.py -h
usage: mycode.py [-h] [-t] [-v]

Prepare something code.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help     show this help message and exit
  -t, --tabular  print something in tabular way for EXCEL
  -v, --verbose

What I want to do is to simply running the code: $ my code.py without any -h option whatsoever to print the usage. How can I do that?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by alecxe, bernie, Robᵩ, immibis, Donal Fellows Mar 13 '14 at 15:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
If you expect exactly one of -t or -v to be used, you might consider having a single positional parameter with choices=("tabular", "t", "verbose", "v") instead. – chepner Mar 13 '14 at 3:52
3  
That 2010 question only had 1 answer, and it isn't a particularly simple or obvious one. – hpaulj Mar 13 '14 at 4:03
    
@chepner: Can you give specific code. You're right I need exactly one of -t or -v to be used. – neversaint Mar 13 '14 at 4:19

That 2010 question covers the same thing, but only has 1 answer. While that answer comes indirectly from the designer of argparse, it does not cover all possibilities.

Here's one which surprised me as to its simplicity:

import sys
parser = ...
if len(sys.argv[1:])==0:
    parser.print_help()
    # parser.print_usage() # for just the usage line
    parser.exit()
args = parser.parse_args()

Yes you can check all the namespace args for default values, but that gets old if there are many arguments. But here I am just checking whether there are any argument strings. If none, then call the parser's own help function.

ipython does something like this to generate help. It checks sys.argv for some version of help, and produces its own help message(s), before even defining the parser.

share|improve this answer
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description="Prepare something code.")
parser.add_argument("-t","--tabular", help="print something in tabular way for EXCEL",
                      action="store_true")
parser.add_argument("-v","--verbose", action="store_true")
args = parser.parse_args()
if args.tabular:
    print "Tabular print"
elif args.verbose:
    print "VERBOSE"
else:
    print parser.print_help()
share|improve this answer

If you need exactly one of "-t" or "-v" be used, they aren't really optional. I'd use a positional parameter instead:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description="Prepare something code.")
parser.add_argument("type", choices=("tabular", "verbose", "t", "v"))
args = parser.parse_args()
if args.type in ("tabular", "t"):
    print "Tabular print"
else:  # Must be "verbose" or "v"
    print "VERBOSE"

Then your program would be called using one of the following:

$ my_code t
$ my_code tabular
$ my_code v
$ my_code verbose

No argument would produce

$ my_code
usage: my_code [-h] {tabular,verbose,t,v}
my_code: error: too few arguments
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