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For example:

This is ok

<div>
<p>some <strong>long</strong> text</p>
<strong>- end -</strong>
<p>some long text</p>
</div>

Or this is more semantically correct?

<div>
<p>some <strong>long</strong> text</p>
<p><strong>- end -</strong></p>
<p>some long text</p>
</div>
share|improve this question

If it isn't a paragraph, then it shouldn't be marked up as a paragraph. (The HTML specification explains how to read the DTD to determine what elements are allowed at a given point in a document.)

<p><strong>- end -</strong></p>

… however, I don't know what this is. You should follow the normal rules for grammar.

share|improve this answer
    
<strong>- end -</strong> this is a indication of end of paragraph after each paragraph in MS word file which i got from client – Jitendra Vyas Feb 10 '10 at 13:38
1  
Then the semantic solution is: </p> – Quentin Feb 10 '10 at 13:42
    
There's a <strong> - end - </strong> at the end of every paragraph? That's...interesting. If they're using it like that and they want to keep the content, then <br/><strong> - end - </strong></p> is the answer. But I prefer David's -- just </p> and drop the thing, if they'll let you. – T.J. Crowder Feb 10 '10 at 13:44
    
you mean even <strong> is valid but we should wrap in <p>. – Jitendra Vyas Feb 10 '10 at 13:46

Academic answer: both are XHTML-compatible. Practical answer: browsers won't give a sh@t about it

share|improve this answer

If the content is not a paragraph, then it is not semantic to mark it as such.

If your end marker is designed to be read, then it is debatable whether or not it is actually a paragraph or not. If it's not designed to be read, then it shouldn't be marked up with reading-oriented tags like <strong>, but instead should be in a span or div with a stylesheet applied to make the font weight bold.

share|improve this answer

Seems to me that "- end -" is a case for an <hr/> or a p:after{content:"-end-"}

share|improve this answer
    
p:after{content:"-end-"} is supported in all browsers? – Jitendra Vyas Feb 10 '10 at 16:36
1  
No, it isn't, but if it is purely presentational this may not be critical. – graphicdivine Feb 10 '10 at 16:58

As you mentioned the lower is more semantically correct as the <strong> tag is not a block level element which means you need to wrap it in the <p>. Otherwise I'm sure you will come across issues when you try and validate your HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
There are plenty of elements other than p that a strong element may be a child of. Also, "Validity" and "Semantics" are very different things. – Quentin Feb 10 '10 at 13:36
    
Agreed. But as far as using just <strong>This is Bold</strong> you will come into issues with validating your HTML. – Rob Such Feb 10 '10 at 13:38
2  
In the example given in the question, the strong element is a child of div element … which is valid. – Quentin Feb 10 '10 at 13:43

The spec doesn't say you have to. The validator is happy for you to have it in some other block-level container.

share|improve this answer

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