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    String date1 = "13/03/2014 16:56:46 AEDT";

    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss z");
    sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+12"));
    java.util.Date convertedDate = (java.util.Date) sdf.parse(date1);
    SimpleDateFormat outFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat("EE MMM dd yyyy HH:mm:ss z");
    outFormatter.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+12"));
    String output = outFormatter.format(convertedDate);
    System.out.println("Date in NZ Timezone : " + output);

I am trying to convert AEDT date into dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss z but it gives me exception :

Exception in thread "main" java.text.ParseException: Unparseable date: "13/03/2014 16:56:46 AEDT" at java.text.DateFormat.parse(DateFormat.java:337)

Please help me with this....

I need to convert users time in to my UTC time for making it same through my web-application ...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It means that Java does not support AEDT abbreviation, but since you know timezone offset you can doit this way

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss");
sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+12"));
java.util.Date convertedDate = (java.util.Date) sdf.parse(date1);
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Your code seems to be right, but AEDT is not a valid General Time Zone. Thats the reason for the java.text.ParseException. Instead you can do:

String date1 = "13/03/2014 16:56:46 "+TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT-11").getID();

Input:

13/03/2014 16:56:46 GMT+12:00

Output:

Date in NZ Timezone : Fr Mrz 14 2014 15:56:46 GMT+12:00

It seems to work right:)

From the Doc's:

Three-letter time zone IDs

For compatibility with JDK 1.1.x, some other three-letter time zone IDs (such as "PST", "CTT", "AST") are also supported. However, their use is deprecated because the same abbreviation is often used for multiple time zones (for example, "CST" could be U.S. "Central Standard Time" and "China Standard Time"), and the Java platform can then only recognize one of them.

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