Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm learning Python (3.x) from a Java background.

I have a python program where I create a personObject and add it to a list.

p = Person("John")
list.addPerson(p)

But for flexibility I also want to be able to declare it directly in the addPerson method, like so:

list.addPerson("John")

The addPerson method will be able to differentiate whether or not I'm sending a Person-object or a String.

In Java I would create two separate methods, like this:

void addPerson(Person p) {
    //Add person to list
}

void addPerson(String personName) {
    //Create Person object
    //Add person to list
}

I'm not able to find out how to do this in Python. I know of a type() function, which I could use to check whether or not the parameter is a String or an Object. However, that seems messy to me. Is there another way of doing it?

EDIT:

I guess the alternative workaround would be something like this(python):

def addPerson(self, person):
    //check if person is string
        //Create person object

    //Check that person is a Person instance
        //Do nothing

    //Add person to list

But it seems messy compared to the overloading solution in Java.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, Todd Ditchendorf, Richard Inglis, Philipp Jahoda, Sherlock Mar 13 '14 at 13:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
You may be interested in Five-minute multimethods in Python, written by the Benevolent Dictator himself. –  Kevin Mar 13 '14 at 11:37
    
@MartijnPieters: I don't think, this is a duplicate. I think he is asking for the same methods only not the separate class to implement polymorphism. Actually, even I was looking for the same. In one class can I use same named methods twice, just the datatype of the parameter is different, but the count same?. –  Laxmikant Gurnalkar Mar 13 '14 at 11:42
    
@LaxmikantGurnalkar: Indeed, I agree that that target is not a great dupe target. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '14 at 11:43
    
@Kevin: This is useful Thanks –  Laxmikant Gurnalkar Mar 13 '14 at 11:43
3  

2 Answers 2

One common way I've used to implement this particular pattern is like this:

def first(self, person):
    try:
        person = Person(person)
    except ConstructionError as e: 
        pass
    # do your thing

I don't know if that will work for you or not. You want to catch whatever error Person would generate here if you call it with an existing Person. It's probably even better if that's something like person_factory, as it can just return the existing object if it's already a person instead of throwing an exception.

Multimethods are just different in Python; Python lets you implement almost any kind of semantic interface you want, at the cost of extra work under the hood somewhere, and you can usually move around where this 'somewhere' is to best hide it from you.

Also... there are advantages to this... things that you see sometimes in C++/C#/Java like this:

 int sum(int a, int b) {
     return (a+b)
 }
 float sum (float a, float b) {
     return (a+b)
 }
 etc.

can be replaced in python with just

 def sum(a,b):
      return a+b

(though C++ and C# have auto now that can handle things like this too, afaik).

share|improve this answer
    
Is this considered to be a "pythonic" way of solving it? I mean, if I want to do the same thing with Person's constructor/__init__ I might get some nasty bugs. So it seems a bit messy. Also, it's practically a type-checking solution, like the one I mentioned in the main post. –  Naioai Studios Mar 13 '14 at 12:19
    
Calling Person's constructor inside its own constructor is a bit dicey in any language. Any solution is going to be a 'type-checking' solution somewhere - in compiled languages, the type-checking is automatic, and in the compiler; in Python, you have to do it yourself, because the type isn't even known until you actually call the function. –  Corley Brigman Mar 13 '14 at 12:28
    
Ohh, sorry. I meant, if I wanted there to be multiple versions of the constructor as well. Not as in, calling the constructor recursively. If person is not a string, but the program runs without errors in person = Person(person), that would leave an opening to bugs in the future. As far as I can tell at least. But this is maybe the downside of loosely typed languages and not your solution? –  Naioai Studios Mar 13 '14 at 12:45
    
It is a downside and upside of loosely typed languages... if, later on, you decide to implement a constructor for Person that initializes from a dict, in this case, nothing changes - it 'just works', because python doesn't care what p is - only the Person constructor does, and it doesn't have to decide if it likes the input until it's actually in the constructor. Your code just says 'I need a Person, so if it isn't one, make one, and the expectation is that Person(p)` will do that, or throw an error. –  Corley Brigman Mar 13 '14 at 13:17
    
in Java, you'd have to add another overloaded signature to handle it. the downside is that the Person constructor could maybe construct something when you don't want it to, but I think it's easier to special-case out the exceptions than special-case in the whitelist. –  Corley Brigman Mar 13 '14 at 13:19

Using the reference pointed by @Kevin you can do something like:

from multimethod import multimethod

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, myname):
        self.name = myname

    def __str__(self):
        return self.name

    def __repr__(self):
        return self.__str__()


@multimethod(list, object)
def addPerson(l, p):
    l = l +[p]
    return l

@multimethod(list, str)
def addPerson(l, name):
    p = Person(name)
    l = l +[p]
    return l


alist = []
alist = addPerson(alist, Person("foo"))
alist = addPerson(alist, "bar")
print(alist)

The result will be:

$ python test.py
[foo, bar]

(you need to install multimethod first)

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.