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My requirements are the following:

  • I've got a rich webpage that at a certain moment loads a bunch of HTML in a div, via AJAX.
  • The HTML I retrieve does have javascript (<script>...</script>)
  • The retrieved javascript contains $('document').ready( ... ) parts
  • I can not modify the retrieved javascript; it comes from an external lib
  • I've got a javascript function that is called when the AJAX is loaded. I'm trying to "trick it" into executing by doing:

    function AjaxLoaded() {
      $('document').trigger('ready');
    }
    

That doesn't cut it, I'm afraid.

I've seen several responses on Stack Overflow that "evade" this question by changing the code that is returned on the AJAX (make it a function and call it after loading, or just remove the $(document).ready()). I need to stress out that I can't change the retrieved code on this case.

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this was an interesting problem, i had to look at the jquery code to see what was happening to the ready events. –  John Boker Feb 10 '10 at 17:04
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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Afer some research i created a way to get it to work.

here is my test that shows it working: http://www.antiyes.com/test/test2.php

here is the relevant code:

<script>
    // easy copy of an array
    Array.prototype.copy = function() {
        return [].concat(this);
    };

    // this function is added to jQuery, it allows access to the readylist
    // it works for jQuery 1.3.2, it might break on future versions
    $.getReadyList = function() {
        if(this.readyList != null)
            this.myreadylist =  this.readyList.copy();      
        return this.myreadylist;
    };

    $(document).ready(function() {
        alert("blah");
    });

</script>

<script>

    // this should be added last so it gets all the ready event
    $(document).ready(function() {
        readylist = $.getReadyList();
    });

</script>

then in the body I have:

<input type="button" onclick="$(readylist).each(function(){this();});" value="trigger ready" />

basically what i did was add a function to jQuery that copies the readyList before it's cleared out, then it will be available to be used by you.

it looks like the code below doesnt work:

function AjaxLoaded() {
    $(document).trigger('ready');
}

drop the quotes around document.

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Makes sense since document is an object and not an element. +1 for research. –  Mark Schultheiss Feb 10 '10 at 17:11
2  
John, you totally blew my mind with this one. This is definitively a +1 and correct answer! Just one minor comment: would you mind including the code on the answer, in addition to providing a link to the test page? This is too good to be lost if in two years you change your hosting :) –  kikito Feb 10 '10 at 20:50
1  
@egarcia will do –  John Boker Feb 10 '10 at 21:33
    
thanks a lot, john! –  kikito Feb 10 '10 at 23:45
    
Great job on this work-around; extremely useful. Also, very good job on explaining it and providing a working demo. Thank you. –  Jessy Houle Jun 1 '10 at 17:02
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Since the jQuery readyList is not exposed as of version 1.4 (discussed here) the nice solutions above are broken.

A way around this is by creating your own readyList, through overriding the original jQuery-ready method. This needs to be done before other scripts that use the original ready method are loaded. Otherwise just the same code as John/Kikito:

// Overrides jQuery-ready and makes it triggerable with $.triggerReady
// This script needs to be included before other scripts using the jQuery-ready.
// Tested with jQuery 1.7
(function(){
var readyList = [];

// Store a reference to the original ready method.
var originalReadyMethod = jQuery.fn.ready;

// Override jQuery.fn.ready
jQuery.fn.ready = function(){
if(arguments.length && arguments.length > 0 && typeof arguments[0] === 'function') {
  readyList.push(arguments[0]);
}

// Execute the original method.
originalReadyMethod.apply( this, arguments );
};

// Used to trigger all ready events
$.triggerReady = function() {
  $(readyList).each(function(){this();});
};
})();

I'm not sure whether it is advisable to override the ready method. Feel free to advise me on that. I have not yet found any side effects myself though.

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1  
Mind that it is $(readyList).each(function(){this();});, capital L –  digital illusion Nov 30 '11 at 10:12
    
Thank you for pointing that out! It has been corrected. –  rakaloof Dec 5 '11 at 10:29
    
Awesome fix, thanks! –  Eugene Dec 30 '11 at 19:10
    
+1, this solution still works with 1.10.1. I've made a fiddle and used it in an answer, obviously linking this as the source. Great work @rakaloof –  Andrea Ligios Jan 24 at 10:53
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Just in case anyone needs it, I refined John's solution a bit so it could be used directly as an included javascript file.

// jquery_trigger_ready.js
// this function is added to jQuery, it allows access to the readylist
// it works for jQuery 1.3.2, it might break on future versions
$.getReadyList = function() {
  if(this.readyList != null) { this.myreadylist = [].concat(this.readyList); }
  return this.myreadylist;
};

$(document).ready(function() {
  readylist = $.getReadyList();
});

$.triggerReady = function() {
  $(readylist).each(function(){this();});
}

Including this file after including jquery allows for triggering ready by invoking $.triggerReady(). Example:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>trigger ready event</title>
    <script src="test2_files/jquery-1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="jquery_trigger_ready.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <input onclick="$.triggerReady();" value="trigger ready" type="button">
    <script type="text/javascript">
      $(document).ready(function(){
          alert("blah");
      });
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

By the way, I wanted to make it $(document).triggerReady(). If anyone is willing to share some advice on that, ill be appreciated.

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you mean $(document).__proto__.triggerReady = function() { $(readylist).each(function(){this();}); } ? I know proto is depreciated but it is the only thing that works in Opera... –  SparK Oct 20 '11 at 17:13
1  
Sorry, I have no idea what you are talking about. Opera doesn't adding functions to $? –  kikito Oct 21 '11 at 15:52
    
there's another way of using prototypes, but opera only supports the old way which is proto. by the way that line in my other comment: instead of using $.triggerReady you use $(document).__proto__.triggerReady so that you can use $(document).triggerReady(); like you wanted. –  SparK Oct 24 '11 at 9:47
    
That's weird. Opera is usually very good at standards and stuff. Do you have a link to a document or example that shows this? I could not find anything. –  kikito Oct 24 '11 at 14:00
    
getPrototypeOf at MDN here, it's the normal way, but then in the end of the page they say Opera can't handle it, even tough it's a Mozilla link I guess it can be trusted... –  SparK Oct 24 '11 at 16:22
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We had the same problem and solved it another way.

Instead of

$(document).ready(function () {
  $('.specialClass').click(....

We used :

$(document).bind('ready', function(event) {
  $('.specialClass', event.target).click(..

jQuery will trigger a "ready" event on the document as usual. When we load the content of a new div via ajax, we can write:

loadedDiv.trigger('ready')

And have all the initialization performed only on the div, obtaining what expected.

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I really like this solution, but since it was posted this has been added to the jQuery docs: "$(document).bind("ready", handler), deprecated as of jQuery 1.8" I've tried switching to on() instead and it almost works, except document ready doesn't call it. Could be because of deprecation or this part of doc: "if the ready event has already fired and you try to .bind("ready") the bound handler will not be executed." Any thoughts on how to make that solution work? –  John-Philip Nov 30 '12 at 16:50
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Simone Gianni's Answer I think is the most elegant and clean.

and you can even simplify it to become even more easy to use:

jQuery.fn.loadExtended = function(url,completeCallback){
    return this.load(url,function(responseText, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
        if (completeCallback !== undefined && completeCallback !== null) {
            completeCallback(responseText, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest);
        }
        $(this).trigger("ready");
    });
};

So, now instead of using:

$(".container").load(url,function(responseText, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
    $(this).trigger("ready");
});

you can just use:

$(".container").loadExtended("tag_cloud.html");

or:

$(".container").loadExtended("tag_cloud.html",function(){ 
    alert('callback function') 
});

This has the advantage of only applying the trigger on the div that's being updated.

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