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What is the advantage of passing in a strategy to execute as a method argument as opposed to having the implementation in an explicit method? For example, consider this calculator class:

Edited to include IOperation interface

public class Calculator
{
    public double DoOperation(IOperation operation, double num1, double num2)
    {
        return operation.Execute(num1, num2);
    }
}

public interface IOperation
{
    double Execute(double num1, double num2);
}

public class AddOperation : IOperation
{
    public override double Execute(double num1, double num2)
    {
        return num1 + num2;
    }
}

// Leaving out implementations for SubtractOperation, DivideOperation, and MultiplyOperation

As opposed to:

public class Calculator
{
    public double Add(double num1, double num2)
    {
        return num1 + num2;
    }

    public double Subtract(double num1, double num2)
    {
        return num1 - num2;
    }

    public double Multiply(double num1, double num2)
    {
        return num1 * num2;
    }

    public double Divide(double num1, double num2)
    {
        return num1 / num2;
    }   
}

With the strategy pattern, if you need to add an operation, you must create and test a new class. In the second example, you must create and test a new method. Seems like the same difference to me. In fact, I prefer the explicit method name version better because I think it's easier to understand.

There is only one advantage I can think of for the strategy pattern. That is, if you are developing a framework for other people to use, and you really can't determine what strategy other people might implement.

In all other cases, there are always a finite number of strategies that can be implemented. So, what advantage does the strategy pattern have over the explicit method name 'pattern'?

Edit

Thanks to Markus, there is another advantage that I can think of to the above pattern. In the first example, if the DoOperation() method performed a more complex algorithm, and only used the strategy to factor out the differing code, then this would be an example of DRY. And if the differing code is factored out into strategies, then there is a clear benefit to being able to test the strategies and the common part in isolation.

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1  
This doesn't look like the strategy pattern I know (no interface, no inheritance). I would call your example the Delegate pattern. The point of the strategy pattern as I know it is to allow you to treat variants of a type as the same when you look at them from the right perspective, in that they all have the same methods on them. I would suggest a case where you have 3 kinds of calculators, one for bin, one for Deci, and one for Hex. the driver doesn;t know which kind of calculator they have, but can run Add(op1, op2) on any of them, and get the implementation specific result. –  Frank Thomas Mar 13 at 13:49
    
this is not strategy pattern, which would be: public class Calculator { private IOperationStrategy _innerStrategy; public double DoOperation(double num1, double num2) { return _innerStrategy.Execute(num1, num2); } public void SetOperation(IOperationStrategy strategy) { _innerStrategy = strategy } } sorry, in comments the formatting is lost. –  inquisitive Mar 13 at 13:52
    
Well, I didn't include the IOperation interface and specific implementations because I thought it was clear. But, I can edit the question to include them. So, are you saying that the strategy pattern needs a private member variable to hold the strategy? That seems like a trivial distinction. –  jrahhali Mar 13 at 13:55
    
This is not Strategy - looks more like Command. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command_pattern#Example The advantages are explained in the pattern en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command_pattern#Uses –  Fuhrmanator Mar 13 at 16:53
    
@Fuhrmantor Thanks for the links. They were informative. The wiki article on the strategy pattern, however, is almost identical to the code I posted. The only difference I see is that the strategy is stored as a private member variable, instead of being passed along with a method invocation. I see more similarities with the wiki strategy pattern than I do with the Command pattern. However, I could be misinterpreting something - I am definitely not an expert on design patterns. –  jrahhali Mar 14 at 11:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your sample is a pretty short one that supports the perceiption that using a Strategy is not too much value over the separate-method-approach. However, in a more complex situation the DoOperation method will be much more complex und call the Strategy only at specific points in its algorithm.

In this case you might want to test the Context algorithm (in your case the Calculator class) separately without mixing the tests with specific implementations in the methods. The pattern enables you to separate these algorithms and test them separately. If a test fails, you can easily identify the block of code that led to the failure. If you follow the separate-method-approach, the probability is high that the methods share some common (or worse: duplicate) code that is located in the Context in the pattern. In this case, if you receive a test failure, it is harder to identify the part of code that leads to the failure.

In addition, implementing a Strategy supports the Open-Closed-principle as the Context class does not need to be changed if you add another Strategy. Also the existing Strategies remain unchanged.

Another advantage of the Strategy pattern is that you can change the Strategy at run time. Typically, the current Strategy is published as a property of the Context. If for some reason you decide that you need to change the behavior of the Context, you simply create the new Strategy and assign it to the property of the Context. If you follow the separate-method-approach, you decide at compile time which method you want to call. Of course you can add some if statements to react on some conditions. If using a Strategy, you can assign another Strategy to the Context and do not need to use if statements. This reduces the number of cases you need to test.

Which approach suits a specific situation better depends on the situation, but there are definitely strong reasons to implement a Strategy.

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Thanks for your comments. How advantageous is it to be able to test individual strategies in isolation as opposed to testing a new method of a class? Could you elaborate on changing the strategy on run time? I don't think I know what this really means. –  jrahhali Mar 13 at 14:33
    
@jrahhali: I've updated my answer; I hope that it helps. –  Markus Mar 13 at 14:46
    
I can only think of one instance where you can eliminate an ifelse structure:in cases where you have a a ui widget that contains a list of items (dropdown, for ex). When the user makes a selection, the value of the selection can be an strategy. In all other cases, some external code must decide between the different strategies to use. Therefore, I still don't see the difference between deciding on what strategy to pass v. deciding what method to call. I do see the pattern useful for swapping out different implementations on object construction though...Just not as a method parameter. –  jrahhali Mar 13 at 16:56
    
I do agree with you that my example is trivial, and perhaps when I encounter a more complex problem, I will see a real benefit. –  jrahhali Mar 13 at 16:57
    
@jrahhali: yes, it really depends on the situation. Another way to avoid if-Statements would be to configure the Strategy to use in a file and create it dynamically. –  Markus Mar 13 at 17:42

If you are only ever going to add/subtract, multiply and divide then you can probably just have those 4 methods.

but what if you ever want to add new operations in the future (like advanced calculus operations)? Instead of adding even more methods which would break all preexisting users of the Calculator class, you or someone else can just create a new implementation of the Operation Strategy to perform that operation and pass it to your calculator and it will just work.

This way, the calculator class and any other classes that use the Calculator class's API won't break and you get to add new operations in the future, or even on the fly.

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I don't have much experience with production code, but how would adding a new method break the api of calculator? If there are users of my calculator, and I added a new operation, how would adding a method to the calculator class be different then adding a new operation? –  jrahhali Mar 13 at 14:36
    
You are right, I didn't see that Calculator was a class. Adding methods to interfaces is much harder and will break all implementations that don't have that new method yet. But adding methods to classes isn't fool proof either. If a subclass already has a method with a similar enough signature, then it could either cause complication problems or runtime problems if the similar named method doesn't do exactly what the new Calculator method does. –  dkatzel Mar 13 at 17:42

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