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I'm running a server that requires a blacklist of weak cipher suites.

So which of the following are weak? http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/security/SunProviders.html#SunJSSEProvider

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Supporting Elliptic Curve in Java is extremely difficult. RSA, Diffie-Hellman, and Triple-DES aren't "weak", they just aren't "the best". –  erickson Feb 10 '10 at 16:52
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Why do you need to exclude the bad ones? Why not only include the good ones?

For starters, I'd follow the NSA Suite B guidelines, specifically RFC 5430

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@John Smith: agreeing with Kevin here. For anything related to security, disable everything by default and then whitelist what you want to allow. That's how good firewall are configured too: deny everything by default, "whitelist" authorized traffic. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Feb 10 '10 at 15:51
    
Jetty uses a black list up until version 6.1.21 so I'm stuck for now lol –  John Smith Feb 10 '10 at 15:54
    
@John We get around that by overriding the SslSocketConnector#createFactory() method to provide a pre-configured SSLServerSocketFactory that will create sockets with the correct cipher suites enabled on them. –  Kevin Feb 10 '10 at 15:58
    
I know but I can't change that right now so it's all good. If I understand the RFC correctly the only two viable cipher suites supported by JAVA are: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA –  John Smith Feb 10 '10 at 16:06
    
You can get the default listing of enabled cipher suites from here. Anything that is in there but not in RFC 5430 can be considered "weak" I suppose: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/net/ssl/… –  Kevin Feb 10 '10 at 16:10
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Blacklist

I think the anonymous modes are unequivocally useless:

  • SSL_DH_anon_WITH_RC4_128_MD5
  • TLS_DH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_DH_anon_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DH_anon_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DH_anon_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DH_anon_EXPORT_WITH_RC4_40_MD5
  • SSL_DH_anon_EXPORT_WITH_DES40_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_NULL_SHA

As are the deliberately hobbled "export" suites:

  • SSL_RSA_EXPORT_WITH_RC4_40_MD5
  • SSL_RSA_EXPORT_WITH_DES40_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DHE_RSA_EXPORT_WITH_DES40_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DHE_DSS_EXPORT_WITH_DES40_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_KRB5_EXPORT_WITH_RC4_40_SHA
  • TLS_KRB5_EXPORT_WITH_RC4_40_MD5
  • TLS_KRB5_EXPORT_WITH_DES_CBC_40_SHA
  • TLS_KRB5_EXPORT_WITH_DES_CBC_40_MD5

I assume you want encryption, which rules out the "null" cipher:

  • SSL_RSA_WITH_NULL_MD5
  • SSL_RSA_WITH_NULL_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_NULL_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_NULL_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_NULL_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_NULL_SHA

I don't think the HMAC algorithm allows the known weaknesses of MD5 to be exploited, but when in doubt, throw it out:

  • SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5
  • TLS_KRB5_WITH_RC4_128_MD5
  • TLS_KRB5_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_MD5
  • TLS_KRB5_WITH_DES_CBC_MD5

Key size for the DES is too small:

  • SSL_RSA_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA
  • SSL_DHE_DSS_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_KRB5_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA

The Kerberos exchange is only applicable if you are running Kerberos, which is unlikely, and you would know it if you were:

  • TLS_KRB5_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • TLS_KRB5_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA

I usually throw out RC4, because it isn't necessary and I'm not totally comfortable with it.

  • SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA

The AES is strong enough with 128-bit keys, and there are some results against 256-bit keys that could be extended in the future:

  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA

Elliptical Curve algorithms might be the best key agreement there is, but unfortunately, putting them into practice is difficult. Interoperability problems around named curve support in Java are common, and real CA's are not yet issuing EC certs. So, sadly, the EC algorithms aren't easily implemented yet:

  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA

Whitelist

Are you sure that Jetty doesn't support a white list? That is different from every other SSL setup I've seen. Usually, not only do you provide a whitelist, but the list is ordered, with the most preferred algorithms first. You likely have an RSA certificate, in which case I'd order the residue like this:

  1. TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  2. SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
  3. TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  4. SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA

If you have a DSA certificate, the list would look like this:

  1. TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  2. SSL_DHE_DSS_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA
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We tried this approach, allowing just whitelisted, but IOS and IE9 seem to fail to stablish ssl connection. Any ideas? –  Rafael Oct 12 '11 at 12:41
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Pretty sure Jetty is blacklist.

Anyways my issue is solved. Thanks

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Versions after 7.0.2 of Jetty now include a whitelist feature for cipher suites. Just add a section to your etc/jetty-ssl.xml like the following:

  <Call name="addConnector">
    <Arg>
      <New class="org.eclipse.jetty.server.ssl.SslSelectChannelConnector">
        <Arg><Ref id="sslContextFactory" /></Arg>
        <Set name="Port">8443</Set>
        <Set name="maxIdleTime">30000</Set>
        <Set name="Acceptors">2</Set>
        <Set name="AcceptQueueSize">100</Set>

        <!--you can enable cipher suites in the following section. -->
        <Set name="IncludeCipherSuites">
          <Array type="java.lang.String">
            <Item>TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA</Item>
            <Item>SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA</Item>
            <Item>TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA</Item>
            <Item>SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA</Item>

            <Item>TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA</Item>
            <Item>SSL_DHE_DSS_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA</Item>
          </Array>
        </Set>
      </New>
    </Arg>
  </Call>

Doing so will automatically blacklist any cipher suites that aren't listed in this section.

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