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I'm trying to find the best way to find/set all cells surrounding a 3D location. This is sort of a clustering problem. I would like to cluster 'groups' of cells around a few particular locations.

For example, given a cell distance of 2, a 3D array of (4,4,4), and a list of 3D locations:

(0, 0, 0)
(0, 2, 0)
(3, 0, 0)

Assume the given array is all zeros.

I'd like to return a 3D array that has 1 in all the cells that are within the cell distance of 2 from any location.

So, any cell that is 2 or less away from the above locations (including the location itself) should have a 1 in it.

I want to use numpy slicing instead of a Python for loops for performance.

Here's a sample input and output:

distance = 2
shape = (4, 4, 4)
locations = [(2, 0, 0)]

return should be:

array([[[1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0]],

       [[1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0]],

       [[1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0]],

       [[1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0]]], dtype=int32)

Essentially a cube of size 2x2x2 is formed around the 'central' point (2, 0, 0)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does this do what you want?

import numpy as np

distance = 2
shape = (4, 4, 4)
locations = np.array([(2, 0, 0)])

data = np.zeros(shape, np.int)

data[locations[:,0], locations[:,1], locations[:,2]] = 1

import scipy.ndimage
scipy.ndimage.binary_dilation(data, np.ones((3,3,3)), 2)
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I tried it briefly and it looks correct. However, I don't quite understand what's going on with np.ones(3,3,3) and binary_dilation. Could you provide a layman's description? The scipy docs were a little dense. It looks like np.ones(3,3,3) is the size of the 'cube' that's needed. So it should depend on distance right? –  durden2.0 Mar 13 at 15:00
    
@durden2.0 see homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/rbf/HIPR2/dilate.htm –  Mr E Mar 13 at 15:04
    
@MrE Thanks, looks like I have some reading to do! –  durden2.0 Mar 13 at 15:21
    
Yeah; the ones are the 'stencil'. The nice thing about this approach over writing to a sliced cube, for instance, is that you can also use more complicated stencils, which are not cubes. –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Mar 13 at 15:26

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