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How can I enforce that trickyMethod's arguments are the same at compile time but at the same time also have the common super type Fruit ?

So in other words, tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) should not compile.

I am sure there must be a simple solution but I just spent 1 hour searching for the answer and still have no idea :(

I tried implicit evidence with <:< but I could not get it to work.

class Fruit
class Apple extends Fruit
class Banana extends Fruit

class TrickyClass[T<:Fruit]{
  def trickyMethod(p1:T,p2:T)= println("I am tricky to solve!")
}

object TypeInferenceQuestion extends App{
  val tricky=new TrickyClass[Fruit]()
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Apple,new Apple) //this should be OK
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Banana) //this should be OK
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile

}

EDIT :

Thank you for the answers !

Follow up (more general) question:

This second example is a more general case of the first example.

class Fruit

class Apple extends Fruit
class Banana extends Fruit

class TrickyClass[T]{
  def trickyMethod[S<:T](p1:S,p2:S)= println("I am tricky to solve!")
}

object TypeInferenceQuestion extends App{
  val tricky=new TrickyClass[Fruit]()
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Apple,new Apple) //this should be OK
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Banana) //this should be OK
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile

}
share|improve this question
    
Surely you want the generic parameters to go on trickyMethod instead of TrickyClass? You are explicitly allowing T to be Fruit in the definition of tricky. – Lee Mar 13 '14 at 15:25
    
Yes, that is my intention. (This is a simple example that exhibits the same problem which popped up in a more complicated problem.) – jhegedus Mar 13 '14 at 15:30
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could do :

class Tricky[T] {
  def trickyMethod[S1<:T,S2<:T](s1:S1,s2:S2)(implicit ev: S1=:=S2) = println()
}


scala> val t = new Tricky[Seq[Int]]
t: Tricky[Seq[Int]] = Tricky@2e585191

scala> t.trickyMethod(List(1),List(1))
//OK

scala> t.trickyMethod(List(1),Seq(1))
<console>:10: error: Cannot prove that List[Int] =:= Seq[Int].
              t.trickyMethod(List(1),Seq(1))
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks ! I could even write this 2 chars shorter: def trickyMethod[S1,S2<:T](p1:S1,p2:S1) (implicit ev:S1=:=S2) = println("I am tricky to solve!") Great! This simple solution answers both questions. – jhegedus Mar 13 '14 at 15:55
    
For anyone else as baffled as I about "=:=" - it's in Predef. – Ed Staub Mar 13 '14 at 16:48

You can do this with implicits like so. Keep in mind that you will always be able to

tricky.trickyMethod((new Banana): Fruit, (new Apple): Fruit)

since disallowing that would break the subtyping relationship. (If really necessary, you could use Miles Sabin's encoding of "not this type" (see comment #38) to reject Fruit.)

Anyway, one way to achieve what you want is as follows:

class SamePair[T,U] {}
object SamePair extends SamePair[Nothing,Nothing] {
  def as[A] = this.asInstanceOf[SamePair[A,A]]
}
implicit def weAreTheSame[A] = SamePair.as[A]

Now we have an implicit that will give us a dummy object that verifies that two types are the same.

So now we change TrickyClass to

class TrickyClass[T <: Fruit] {
  def trickyMethod[A <: T, B <: T](p1: A, p2: B)(implicit same: SamePair[A,B]) = println("!")
}

And it does what you want:

scala>  val tricky=new TrickyClass[Fruit]()
tricky: TrickyClass[Fruit] = TrickyClass@1483ce25

scala>   tricky.trickyMethod(new Apple,new Apple) //this should be OK
!

scala>   tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Banana) //this should be OK
!

scala>   tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile
<console>:16: error: could not find implicit value for parameter same: SamePair[Banana,Apple]
                tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile
share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. And you have done well to warn about the fact that sub-typing relationships mean that we cannot really prevent the caller to pass two instances with different (runtime) types. But your phrasing makes it look like using Miles Sabin's encoding of "not this type" would prevent the problem (but it would not, it's just a tool enabling another way to write essentially the same constraints as you have done manually here) – Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 13 '14 at 15:45
    
@RégisJean-Gilles - You can encode "not Fruit" with it. That's all. Not "these are the same", just "not Fruit". If everything that is not Fruit is a leaf class, that's enough (in addition to the "same" encoding). Otherwise, you are out of luck, depending on what you want. – Rex Kerr Mar 13 '14 at 15:49
    
Sure, if those are leaf classes the problem goes away (both using your encoding of the constraints or using Miles Sabin's encoding of "not this type"). My point was just that conversely if those are not leaf classes the problem regarding sub-typing is the same in both encodings. – Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 13 '14 at 15:56

Try something like this:

abstract class Fruit[T <: Fruit[T]] {
  def trick(that: T)
}

class Apple extends Fruit[Apple] {
  override def trick(that: Apple) = { println("Apple") }
}

class Banana extends Fruit[Banana] {
  override def trick(that: Banana) = { println("Banana") }
}

class TrickyClass{
  def trickyMethod[T<:Fruit[T]](p1:T,p2:T)= p1.trick(p2)
}

object TypeInferenceQuestion {
  val tricky=new TrickyClass()
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Apple,new Apple) //this should be OK
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Banana) //this should be OK
  tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile
}

it gives:

error: inferred type arguments [Fruit[_ >: Apple with Banana <: Fruit[_ >: Apple with Banana <: ScalaObject]]] do not conform to method trickyMethod's type parameter bounds [T <: Fruit[T]]
         tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile

On the last one.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the only answer that gets a vote from me - much cleaner than implicits, and a common pattern in Java generics. – Ed Staub Mar 13 '14 at 15:50
    
Can this solution be generalised to solve the second (more general) problem ? – jhegedus Mar 13 '14 at 15:58
3  
@EdStaub - I find this pattern very ugly since it introduces a generic parameter to Fruit which now needs to be propagated to everywhere that deals with them, and also doesn't guarantee safety since you can do class LyingFruit extends Fruit[Apple]. – Lee Mar 13 '14 at 15:59
    
@jhegedus I can't think of any way to achieve that, I will edit my answer if I do. – Peter Mar 13 '14 at 16:13

You could use implicits, although you will have to define one for each Fruit subclass:

class Fruit
class Apple extends Fruit
class Banana extends Fruit

trait FruitEvidence[T <: Fruit]

class TrickyClass{
  def trickyMethod[T <: Fruit](p1:T,p2:T)(implicit e: FruitEvidence[T]) = println("I am tricky to solve!")
}

object FruitImplicits {
    implicit val BananaEvidence = new FruitEvidence[Banana] { }
    implicit val AppleEvidence = new FruitEvidence[Apple] { }
}

object TypeInferenceQuestion extends App{
      import FruitImplicits._
      val tricky=new TrickyClass()
      tricky.trickyMethod(new Apple,new Apple) //this should be OK
      tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Banana) //this should be OK
      tricky.trickyMethod(new Banana,new Apple) //this should NOT compile
}
share|improve this answer

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