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What is the most efficient way in C# 2.0 to check each character in a string and return true if they are all valid hexadecimal characters and false otherwise.

Example

void Test()
{
    OnlyHexInString("123ABC"); // returns true
    OnlyHexInString("123def"); // returns true
    OnlyHexInString("123g"); // returns false
}
bool OnlyHexInString(string text)
{
    // Most efficient algorithm to check each digit in C# 2.0 goes here
}
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13 Answers 13

up vote 25 down vote accepted
public bool OnlyHexInString(string test)
{
    // For C-style hex notation (0xFF) you can use @"\A\b(0[xX])?[0-9a-fA-F]+\b\Z"
    return System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(test, @"\A\b[0-9a-fA-F]+\b\Z");
}
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4  
For speed, which the question implies, you would want to compile the regular expression instead of evaluating it continually. –  Robert Paulson Oct 22 '08 at 1:11
3  
To Compile or Not To Compile, That's the Question... tinyurl.com/6ltmxv –  CMS Oct 22 '08 at 2:14
3  
Isn't using a regex at all for this overkill? One day I'll have to measure it, but I can't believe it would be faster than Jeremy Ruten's solution (stackoverflow.com/questions/223832/…). –  Michael Burr Oct 22 '08 at 14:14
4  
Indeed - quick testing (with the help of Jon Skeet's Micro Benchmark code) reveals that even using a pre-compiled regex, the straightforward technique outlined by Jeremy Ruten is about 5 times faster. –  Michael Burr Oct 23 '08 at 1:39
1  
Programmer efficiency v. Program efficiency. As usual, the real answer is 'it depends'. Thx for the link @CMS. –  Robert Paulson Oct 23 '08 at 19:05

Something like this:

(I don't know C# so I'm not sure how to loop through the chars of a string.)

loop through the chars {
    bool is_hex_char = (current_char >= '0' && current_char <= '9') ||
                       (current_char >= 'a' && current_char <= 'f') ||
                       (current_char >= 'A' && current_char <= 'F');

    if (!is_hex_char) {
        return false;
    }
}

return true;

Code for Logic Above

private bool IsHex(IEnumerable<char> chars)
{
    bool isHex; 
    foreach(var c in chars)
    {
        isHex = ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || 
                 (c >= 'a' && c <= 'f') || 
                 (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F'));

        if(!isHex)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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10  
I find it strange that so many people are jumping on regex for this... –  Michael Burr Oct 21 '08 at 23:48
32  
To a man with a hammer, every problem looks like a nail –  Smashery Oct 22 '08 at 0:08

You can do a TryParse on the string to test if the string in its entirity is a HexNumber

If its a particularly long string, you could take it in chunks and loop through it.

// string hex = "bacg123"; doesn't parse
// string hex = "bac123"; parses
 string hex = "bacg123";
 long output;
 long.TryParse(hex, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber, null, out output);
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I use Int32.TryParse() to do this. Here's the MSDN page on it.

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Old, sorry to kick this, but I don't see why everyone chose the complicated options, this is the real, easy, correct and implemented in the framework way to do it: Int32.TryParse("AE0F", System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber, out myHexNumber); –  Roy T. Jul 26 '11 at 8:04
2  
@Roy there is a difference between "Are all these characters valid hex characters?" versus "Is this string parseable as hex AND fits into an Int32?" You make a good point, but is it safe to assuming OP is converting an Int32 hex value? –  Robert Paulson Sep 7 '11 at 23:09
    
For sanity on both Int32 and UInt32, one could create a wrapper call to [U]Int32.TryParse, first checking the length of the passed string. If the length is 10, then there might be a 0x that needs to be verified (to avoid an overflow if it's two extra digits). Else, anything > 8 would be too large for either value. The framework can probably then handle signed vs. unsigned. Repeat for Int16/UInt16, Int64/UInt64, and Byte/SByte. One can probably even create short extension method stubs for these purposes to be extra clever. –  Kumba Nov 6 '11 at 0:43

Here is a LINQ version of yjerem's solution above:

private static bool IsValidHexString(IEnumerable<char> hexString)
{
    return hexString.Select(currentCharacter =>
                (currentCharacter >= '0' && currentCharacter <= '9') ||
                (currentCharacter >= 'a' && currentCharacter <= 'f') ||
                (currentCharacter >= 'A' && currentCharacter <= 'F')).All(isHexCharacter => isHexCharacter);
}
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2  
Novel, and it beats the regex version easily. But a raw while loop is still way faster than LINQ. –  Kumba Nov 6 '11 at 1:30

Posting a VB.NET version of Jeremy's answer, because I came here while looking for such a version. Should be easy to convert it to C#.

''' <summary>
'''   Checks if a string contains ONLY hexadecimal digits.
''' </summary>
''' <param name="str">String to check.</param>
''' <returns>
'''   True if string is a hexadecimal number, False if otherwise.
''' </returns>
Public Function IsHex(ByVal str As String) As Boolean
    If String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(str) Then _
        Return False

    Dim i As Int32, c As Char

    If str.IndexOf("0x") = 0 Then _
        str = str.Substring(2)

    While (i < str.Length)
        c = str.Chars(i)

        If Not (((c >= "0"c) AndAlso (c <= "9"c)) OrElse
                ((c >= "a"c) AndAlso (c <= "f"c)) OrElse
                ((c >= "A"c) AndAlso (c <= "F"c))) _
        Then
            Return False
        Else
            i += 1
        End If
    End While

    Return True
End Function
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In terms of performance the fastest is likely to simply enumerate the characters and do a simple comparison check.

bool OnlyHexInString(string text) {
  for (var i = 0; i < text.Length; i++) {
    var current = text[i];
    if (!(Char.IsDigit(current) || (current >= 'a' && current <= 'f'))) {
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
}

To truly know which method is fastest though you'll need to do some profiling.

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Regex is not very efficient at the best of times. The most efficient will be using a plain for loop to search through the characters of the string, and break on the first invalid one found.

However, it can be done very succinctly with linq:

bool isHex = 
    myString.ToCharArray().Any(c => !"0123456789abcdefABCDEF".Contains(c));

I cannot vouch for the efficiency, since linq is linq, but Any() should have a pretty well-optimised compilation scheme.

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In terms of programmer time, it's probably best to call your platform's string-to-integer parsing function (such as Java's Integer.parseInt(str, base)), and see if you get an exception. If you want to write it yourself, and potentially be more time/space-efficient...

Most efficient I suppose would be a lookup table on each character. You would have a 2^8 (or 2^16 for Unicode)-entry array of booleans, each of which would be true if it is a valid hex character, or false if not. The code would look something like (in Java, sorry ;-):

boolean lut[256]={false,false,true,........}

boolean OnlyHexInString(String text)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < text.size(); i++)
    if(!lut[text.charAt(i)])
      return false;
  return true;
}
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    //Another workaround, although RegularExpressions is the best solution
     boolean OnlyHexInString(String text)
    {
      for(int i = 0; i < text.size(); i++)
        if( !Uri.IsHexDigit(text.charAt(i)) )
          return false;
      return true;
    }
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"RegularExpressions is the best solution" -_- –  Pierre Arlaud Apr 24 at 8:25

This could be done with regular expressions, which are an efficient way of checking if a string matches a particular pattern.

A possible regular expression for a hex digit would be [A-Ha-h0-9], some implementations even have a specific code for hex digits, e.g. [[:xdigit:]].

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1  
Regular expressions aren't an answer for everything. Something as simple as checking for a small range of characters in a string, and bugging out if a single character fails t match is going to be handled much faster using the loop scenario presented above n Jeremy Ruten's answer. I just tested regex, the LINQ version of Jeremy's answer, and the raw loop, and the raw loop approach works out the fastest. –  Kumba Nov 6 '11 at 1:26
1  
Hex digits go up to F not H. –  Ben Challenor Nov 24 '11 at 17:13

You can Extend string and char using someting like this:

    public static bool IsHex(this string value)
    {   return value.All(c => c.IsHex()); }

    public static bool IsHex(this char c)
    {
        c = Char.ToLower(c);
        if (Char.IsDigit(c) || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'f'))
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
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Now, only

if (IsHex(text)) {
    return true;
} else {
    return false;
}
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1  
The question is about implementing this IsHex method. There is no such built-in method. –  Nikhil Dabas Jun 21 '12 at 19:22
4  
By the way, expressions of the form if(test) {return true;} else {return false;} are equivalent to simply return test; –  Nikhil Dabas Jun 21 '12 at 19:23

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