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Say I have an array of shape (32,).

Each element can have one of four int values:0 to 3

If I wanted to create an array for each possible combination I would have 432 ( approximately 1.84 x 1019) arrays - this is overly burdensome.

Is there a straightforward way to pick fewer arrays, say 1 x 106, by picking the 'most dissimilar' combinations?

By 'most dissimilar' I mean avoiding arrays that are different by one (or few) values and picking arrays that have many dissimilar values.

Also, if there is an area of mathematics that I should be looking at to improve my description please let me know.

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Do you have a measure of dissimilarity? E.g. is 3 less similar to 1 than 2 is, or are they all equally dissimilar to each other? –  larsmans Mar 13 at 16:00
    
@larsmans - they are all equally dissimilar –  atomh33ls Mar 13 at 16:01
    
For most practical purposes, simply generating random combinations would be sufficient. What do you need to do with this subset of combinations? –  beaker Mar 13 at 16:15
    
@beaker. It's a long story. Random combinations will probably be sufficient. However, it would be good to know if there is a more rigorous approach. –  atomh33ls Mar 13 at 16:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can find arrays with no position in common with x by randomly changing each position to a different value, e.g.

>>> x = np.random.randint(0, 4, 32)
>>> x
array([3, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 2, 2, 3, 2, 2, 1, 3, 3, 1, 2, 2, 1, 0, 2,
       2, 1, 3, 3, 1, 0, 2, 1, 3])
>>> (x + np.random.randint(1, 4, 32)) % 4
array([0, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 3, 3, 0, 3, 3, 2, 0, 0, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3,
       3, 2, 0, 0, 2, 1, 3, 2, 0])
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Your algorithm could look like this:

  1. Keep the last X (say 10) of the combinations that have been used in a list of some sort.
  2. Pick Y (say 10) combinations randomly.
  3. Analyze each of the Y combinations against the last X combinations to find the most dissimilar combination. This would involve writing a method that would generate a score as to how dissimilar the combination is with each of the last X combinations. Average the score and pick the one that is most dissimilar.
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