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I'm using MySQL's LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE SQL statement to load data from a CSV file into an existing database table.

Here is an example SQL statement:

LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 'file.csv' INTO TABLE my_table
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
ENCLOSED BY '"'
LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
(name, address, dateOfBirth)

The third column in the CSV that maps to the dateOfBirth field currently has the date in the following format:

14-Feb-10

How can I modify the above SQL statement to format the date into MySQL's date format i.e. 2010-02-14?

I know how to convert a string date when using normal INSERT syntax using:

STR_TO_DATE('14-Feb-10', '%d-%b-%y')

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2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You need to use the SET clause, along with a variable to reference the contents of the row at that column. In your column list, you assign your date column to a variable name. You can then use it in your SET statement. (Note, I haven't got MySQL in front of me to test this on.)

LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 'file.csv' INTO TABLE my_table
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
ENCLOSED BY '"'
LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
(name, address, @var1)
set dateOfBirth = STR_TO_DATE(@var1, '%d-%b-%y')

See examples a way down the page at: http://mysql2.mirrors-r-us.net/doc/refman/5.1/en/load-data.html (Not sure why this page seems to differ from the main documentation in that it actually contains an example of SET usage.)

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Pedantic perhaps, but I think that should be %m rather than %M ... –  Everyone Jan 14 '12 at 7:20
2  
@Everyone Thanks. Actually, it looks like it should be %b, for the abbreviated month name, according to the example given in the question. –  Alison R. Jan 24 '12 at 16:49
    
You're right. My bad. –  Everyone Jan 25 '12 at 17:44

A slightly more lengthy process that gives you a bit of testing flexibility:

  • Use a VARCHAR(64) column callsed eg. mydate_text to hold the unformatted date you import.
  • Load up/import the table putting the date into this plain text field
  • Run a query like

    UPDATE mytable SET mydate = STR_TO_DATE(mydate_text, '%Y-%b-%d')

  • If it all looks OK, drop your mydate_text column

  • If it's not OK, simply try again with a new format.

The advantage to this technique is it lets you play around with the formats without having to re-import the table using the somewhat fussy MySQL LOAD DATA syntax, especially with length table columns. If you know exactly what you're doing, the answer above is best. If you're not an expert in MySQL, this technique can be helpful till you get your formats exactly right.

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