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I have written a function to perform permutations of n obejects. I have the variables a=[1],[2],[3];k=1 and n=4;a contains the objects which are 1,2 and 3 respectively.The following is the function code that i have written:

function [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj)

if k==n
    res{jj}=a;
    jj=jj+1;

else
    for i=k:n
        t=a{k};
        a{k}=a{i};
        a{i}=t;
    perm(a,k+1,n,jj)
    t=a{k};
    a{k}=a{i};
    a{i}=t;
    end
end
end

However, when i call the function as:

jj=1;

    [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj)

I am getting the following error displayed:

Error in ==> perm at 3
if k==n

??? Output argument "res" (and maybe others) not assigned during call to "J:\main
project\perm.m>perm".

Error in ==> mainp at 254
    [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj)

The following is the code in the main program with regard to the permutation:

mr=4
    for i=1:mr
        a{i}=i;
    end
    n=mr;
    %This assignment is for the ease to work with.
    %just stored the indices till mr for the purpose of permutation
    k=1;
    %this is the k that the function perm has

  jj=1;

    [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj)

Can somebody please help me resolve this?Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
is it possible perm is a nested function inside perm.m? is it possible you have a variable res in the scope outside perm? –  Shai Mar 13 at 17:43
    
Can you share your entire code? It looks like you're not calling the function correctly. Error in ==> mainp at 254 [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj) –  Myles Baker Mar 13 at 17:45
    
The error message looks right, even if the location is not. Make sure that res is assigned on every path through perm. Right now it is only assigned if k == n. –  Ben Voigt Mar 13 at 17:47
    
@MylesBaker The following is the code in the main program with regard to the permutation: mr=4 for i=1:mr a{i}=i; end n=mr; %This assignment is for the ease to work with. %just stored the indices till mr for the purpose of permutation k=1; %this is the k that the function perm has jj=1; [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj) –  Geethu Ann Joseph Mar 13 at 17:52
    
@shai, i am calling perm recursively. And variable res is used first inside perm,after which its value is returned to the main program –  Geethu Ann Joseph Mar 13 at 17:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your else block leaves res undefined.

I think you're assuming that res is a global variable and all invocations of perm will write into different parts of a single cell array. That isn't true. It is an output variable, local to the current call. There's no sharing during recursion, they all have independent cell arrays named res. The parameter jj is also not shared, so adding one is useless as well.

If you want to use this technique of building up the output, you'll need to make sure it is defined at a wider scope than the recursion. For example, use a local helper function:

function [res]=perm(a,k,n,jj)
    res = {};
    perm_impl(a,k);

    function [] = perm_impl(a,k) // doesn't get its own local res, n, or jj
        if k==n
            res{jj}=a;
            jj=jj+1;
        else
            for i=k:n
                t=a{k};
                a{k}=a{i};
                a{i}=t;
                perm_impl(a,k+1)
                t=a{k};
                a{k}=a{i};
                a{i}=t;
            end
        end
    end
end

Now all runs of perm_impl work on the same cell array res, because Matlab documentation says:

Variables within nested functions are accessible to more than just their immediate function. A variable, x, to which you assign a value or use within a nested function resides in the workspace of the outermost function that both contains the nested function and accesses x.

If you intentionally use a variable in this manner, it is not a problem. For examples, see the MATLAB Programming Demo on Nested Functions.

However, if you unintentionally use a variable in this manner, it can result in unexpected behavior. If the highlighting indicates that the scope of a variable spans multiple functions, and that was not your intent, consider:

  • Renaming the nested function variable so it does not match the outer function variable name.

  • Passing the variable into the function as an input argument instead of using the variable directly within the nested function

I can't tell whether a was supposed to be shared or not...

share|improve this answer
    
So then how can i make it global so that I get all the permutations stored for future processing? –  Geethu Ann Joseph Mar 13 at 18:02
    
Thank you so much. It worked. But I have one more doubt. Eventhough the local function is employed,it is being called recursively.So how exactly building up the output works here. I mean every instance of the local helper function should have its own local variables I suppose? –  Geethu Ann Joseph Mar 13 at 18:13
    
Every instance of the local function has a separate copy of its own local variables, yes. But res does not belong to the local function... Only a and k are local to the helper function. –  Ben Voigt Mar 13 at 20:17
    
@Geethu: Ack! My previous explanation was wrong. Matlab help says "Variables within nested functions are accessible to more than just their immediate function. A variable, x, to which you assign a value or use within a nested function resides in the workspace of the outermost function that both contains the nested function and accesses x." –  Ben Voigt Mar 13 at 21:30
1  
So in reality, I should have said "Every instance of the local function has a separate copy of its input and output parameters". Variables belong to the outer function and are shared between every invocation of the local helper function. –  Ben Voigt Mar 13 at 21:31

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