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Not coding in C++ right now but a question came up when I have a question in C#. Hope experts here can easily give a anwser.

Class A{
  #ifdef AFlag
  public void methodA(){...}
  #endif
}

Class B{
...
  A a;
  a.methodA();
...
}

Class C {
...
  A a;
  a.methodA();
...
}

If the AFlag is NOT defined anywhere, what will happen? A compile error or no error but the methodA AND those statements calling that method will not be compiled? thanks

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This is an example of the complications of using #if to delineate feature specific code. The classes B and C would need to use the same #if. Thus it propagates to any code fragment using A::methodA(). This is how nightmares begin and corporate profits wasted. Another reason to prefer function replacement (by linkers) (or including all the code and using a configuration data file). –  Thomas Matthews Feb 10 '10 at 19:51
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7 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There will be a compile error.

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+1 faster fingers –  David Oneill Feb 10 '10 at 17:20
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Preprocessing happens before compilation. By the time your code goes to the compiler, the definition of method A in class A will be removed. Effectively its as if as you never wrote it. So this will result in compilation error.

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+1 for including the crucial point: The preprocessor has a go at your source file BEFORE the compiler even sees it. The compiler never has a chance to see any preprocessor symbols. –  Scott Smith Feb 10 '10 at 17:46
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Class A will not have an methodA so compiling class B or C will fail.

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You will have a complier error, as the function methodA is not declared anywhere. You could use this syntax instead:

Class A{ 

  public void methodA()
  {
#ifdef AFlag 
    ...
#endif 
  } 

} 

Which will allow methodA to be declared / defined, but it will be optimized away if you turn optimizations on.

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Hard to say for certain, since code in the "..." could affect the answer, or mean that I've misunderstood the question. The statement a.methodA(); has to be in the body of a function.

You'll get compile errors at the lines a.methodA(); (or perhaps linker errors if the code is split across multiple translation units with inconsistent definitions of class A). Calling a function means it has to be there. The call is not "ignored" if the function doesn't exist.

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If AFlag is not defined, class A won't have a member function methodA(), so the calls to it in class B and C will be errors.

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You would see a compile error as the method methodA is not defined on class A.

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