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I need to convert Joda-Time date/time to java.util.Date. I'm doing as follows.

DateTimeFormatter dateTimeFormatter=DateTimeFormat.forPattern("dd-MMM-yyyy hh:mm:ss aa");
DateTime dateTime = dateTimeFormatter.parseDateTime("2-Oct-2013 11:34:26 AM").withZone(DateTimeZone.UTC);

System.out.println(dateTime);

This displays date/time represented by UTC zone as expected. In this case, it is 2013-10-02T06:04:26.000Z

When this dateTime is converted to java.util.Date as follows,

System.out.println(dateTime.toDate());

it shows, Wed Oct 02 11:34:26 IST 2013. It should be in the UTC format.

Is there a way to represent a Date in UTC after converting it from Joda-Time?

I want a date to be stored into a database as represented by the UTC zone. org.joda.time.DateTime needs to be converted to java.util.Date (or java.sql.Timestamp) before inserting it to a database. How to overcome this situation?

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[Fact # 1] The java.util.Date class has no time zone assigned to its date-time value. [Fact # 2] Yet a j.u.Date’s toString method confusingly applies the JVM's default time zone. Your JVM has a default time zone of +05:30 (such as "Asia/Kolkata"). That time zone as applied when the printlin implicitly called the java.util.Date’s toString method. Upshot: Joda-Time has nothing to do with this issue. The issue/problem lies with the badly designed and implemented java.util.Date class. Avoid j.u.Date whenever possible. –  Basil Bourque Jun 23 '14 at 6:11
    
@BasilBourque : but that works in Hibernate using org.jadira.usertype.dateandtime.joda.PersistentDateTime, for example. –  Tiny Nov 14 '14 at 5:55
    
Your comment refers to classes outside Joda-Time and outside your Question. That class is a converter, presumably adding behavior. Irrelevant to the two issues in your Q: (a) The "Wed…" string you expected to be in UTC but is instead in your JVM's default time zone (India time) is the correct but confusing behavior of j.u.Date's toString method as I said in my comment "Fact # 2". (b) Getting Joda-Time to use UTC. Confusion will ensue until you master the two facts in my comment. –  Basil Bourque Nov 14 '14 at 6:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A java.util.Date object per definition is always in UTC!
(timestamp is the number of millis since 1.1.1970 UTC)

But you have to set the timeZone to utc before time formating:

TimeZone utc = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")

SimpleDateFormatter df = new SimpleDateFormatter (PATTERN);
df.setTimeZone(utc);

System.out.println(df.format(date));

In your code you used the java.util.Date.toString() method which uses your system default TimeZone.

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java.util.TimeZone is an abstract class that cannot be instantiated. I think, it should be TimeZone utc = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");. Doing so does not represent the specified date in the UTC zone. It still displays Wed Oct 02 11:34:26 IST 2013. Am I doing something wrong? –  Tiny Mar 13 '14 at 19:43
    
There was a mistake. It worked. –  Tiny Mar 13 '14 at 20:11
    
yes, I updated the wrong code, and changed to getTimeZone(I) as suggested. (I wrote it down without using developping environment). –  AlexWien Mar 14 '14 at 18:33

java.util.Date String Output is Not UTC

From your Question:

it shows, Wed Oct 02 11:34:26 IST 2013. It should be in the UTC format.

No it should not be in UTC format. That may be what you want, but that is not how the class’ behavior is documented.

Your code:

System.out.println(dateTime.toDate());

…is first converting a Joda-Time DateTime to a java.util.Date object, and then implicitly calling the toString method on that j.u.Date object. The documented behavior of a j.u.Date for its toString method is to apply the JVM's currently default time zone to the generated string. Internally, the j.u.Date is indeed in UTC, but its generated string is not. This behavior of its toString was a well-intentioned but ultimately very poor design decision of the Java team that has caused no end of confusion to countless programmers. But it the documented behavior. You should always carefully read a library's documentation rather than assume the library behaves the way you imagine.

Show Joda-Time DateTime In UTC

From your Question:

Is there a way to represent a Date in UTC after converting it from Joda-Time?

Yes, generating a string representation of a Joda-Time DateTime in UTC is easy and clear, unlike dealing with java.util.Date/.Calendar/SimpleDateFormat. Simply call withZone to instantiate a new DateTime based on the original but adjusted to another time zone.

A little example source code in Joda-Time 2.5 should make it obvious. Also search StackOverflow for hundreds of more examples using Joda-Time.

DateTimeZone zoneMontréal = DateTimeZone.forID( "America/Montreal" );
DateTime nowInMontréal = DateTime.now( zoneMontréal );

DateTimeZone zoneKolkata = DateTimeZone.forID( "Asia/Kolkata" );
DateTime nowInKolkata = nowInMontréal.withZone( zoneKolkata ); // Instantiating a new date-time object based on the original but adjusted for another time zone.

DateTime nowInUtc = nowInMontréal.withZone( DateTimeZone.UTC ); // Ditto, new object, adjusted time zone.

When dumped to console by calling toString on each DateTime:

nowInMontréal: 2014-11-14T02:03:19.932-05:00
nowInKolkata: 2014-11-14T12:33:19.932+05:30
nowInUtc: 2014-11-14T07:03:19.932Z

All three of these represent the same simultaneous moment in the timeline of the Universe. Montréal time is five hours behind UTC, India time is five and a half hours ahead of UTC. Same moment, but different wall clock times.

Put a Joda-Time DateTime in Database

From your Question:

I want a date to be stored into a database as represented by the UTC zone. org.joda.time.DateTime needs to be converted to java.util.Date (or java.sql.Timestamp) before inserting it to a database. How to overcome this situation?

Easy. Construct a java.sql.Timestamp object by passing the count of milliseconds since Unix epoch. Note that count must be a long not an int.

java.sql.Timestamp ts = new java.sql.Timestamp( dateTime.getMillis() );

Tip: Be aware of the nature of your database's date-time data types. Postgres for example has excellent support for such types including those defined by the SQL spec. Many database do not, sporting old legacy types or only a few weak types. Read the doc and experiment to make sure you understand the behavior.

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public Date toDate(TimeZone timeZone)

Get the date time as a java.util.Date using the specified time zone.

The Date object created has exactly the same fields as this date-time, except when the time would be invalid due to a daylight savings gap. In that case, the time will be set to the earliest valid time after the gap.

In the case of a daylight savings overlap, the earlier instant is selected.

Converting to a JDK Date is full of complications as the JDK Date constructor doesn't behave as you might expect around DST transitions. This method works by taking a first guess and then adjusting. This also handles the situation where the JDK time zone data differs from the Joda-Time time zone data.

Unlike toDate(), this implementation does not rely on Java's synchronized time zone initialization logic, and should demonstrate better concurrent performance characteristics.

So this would look like:

Timezone utc = Timezone.getTimezone("UTC")
System.out.println(dateTime.toDate(utc));

let me know if it works.

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It still does not display the given date in the UTC zone. It displays Wed Oct 02 11:34:26 IST 2013. –  Tiny Mar 13 '14 at 19:52
    
Have you tried putting it into a simpledateformat: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/text/… –  Muhammad Hijazi Mar 13 '14 at 19:54
    
Yes it is used with SimpleDateFormat. It should show something like, 2013-10-02T06:04:26.000Z (regardless of the format. It can be any valid date-time format). –  Tiny Mar 13 '14 at 19:56
    
Yes, because you are passing it a date object, i think you need to format it again before you print. Try formatting it one more time the print from that, see what happens. Sorry if this isn't amazingly helpful. –  Muhammad Hijazi Mar 13 '14 at 20:11
    
There was a mistake. It worked. –  Tiny Mar 13 '14 at 20:11

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