Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple script that accepts a CSV file and reads every row into an array. I then cycle through each column of the first row (in my case it holds the questions of a survey) and I print them out. The survey is in french and whenever the first character of a question is a special character (é,ê,ç, etc) fgetcsv simply omits it.

Special characters in the middle of the value are not affected only when they are the first character.

I tried to debug this but I am baffled. I did a var_dump with the content of the file and the characters are definitely there:

var_dump(utf8_encode(file_get_contents($_FILES['csv_file']['tmp_name'])));

And here's my code:

if(file_exists($_FILES['csv_file']['tmp_name']) && $csv = fopen($_FILES['csv_file']['tmp_name'], "r"))
    {
        $csv_arr = array();

        //Populate an array with all the cells of the CSV file
        while(!feof($csv))
        {
            $csv_arr[] = fgetcsv($csv);
        }

        //Close the file, no longer needed
        fclose($csv);

        // This should cycle through the cells of the first row (questions)
        foreach($csv_arr[0] as $question)
        {
            echo utf8_encode($question) . "<br />";
        }

    }
share|improve this question
2  
fgetcsv() is only binary-safe if you use plain ASCII - in other words, not at all. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3637770/… - basically, use fgets() to read the data, then parse CSV using a custom function. Apparently this also works: stackoverflow.com/questions/1472886/… –  Piskvor Sep 3 '10 at 17:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you already checked out the manual page on fgetcsv? There is nothing talking about that specific problem offhand, but a number of contributions maybe worth looking through if nothing comes up here.

There's this, for example:

Note: Locale setting is taken into account by this function. If LANG is e.g. en_US.UTF-8, files in one-byte encoding are read wrong by this function.

Also, seeing as it's always in the beginning of the line, could it be that this is really a hidden line break problem? There's this:

Note: If PHP is not properly recognizing the line endings when reading files either on or created by a Macintosh computer, enabling the auto_detect_line_endings run-time configuration option may help resolve the problem.

You may also want to try saving the file with different line endings.

share|improve this answer
    
I've read the manual page on how to use the function and a quick search through the comment area didn't pop up anything for special characters or utf-8 encoding. I had noticed that it could have trouble with UTF-8 encoding but if I don't encode the values the value still doesn't show up. I'm not sure if there would be another way to get around this. I tried using "|" as an end of line delimiter and I get the same problem. This is very confusing :) –  Gazillion Feb 10 '10 at 17:49

Are you setting your locale correctly before calling fgetcsv()?

setlocale(LC_ALL, 'fr_FR.UTF-8');

Otherwise, fgetcsv() is not multi-byte safe.

Make sure that you set it to something that appears in your list of available locales. On linux (certainly on debian) you can see this by doing

locale -a

You should get something like...

C
en_US.utf8
POSIX

For UTF8 support pick an encoding with utf8 on the end. If your input is encoded with something else you'll need to use the appropriate locale - but make sure your OS supports it first.

If you set the locale to a locale which isn't available on your system it won't help you.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry if I come off as ignorant but what is mb-safe? I added the line with no effect to the behaviour of my script. The manual says that the function is binary safe since PHP 4.3.5 (we have php 5 installed) –  Gazillion Feb 10 '10 at 17:53
2  
Multi Byte Safe = able to handle encodings in which a single character can consist of more than one byte (e.g. UTF-8). –  Pekka 웃 Feb 10 '10 at 18:01
    
Ah thanks! I guess I'll leave it there :) –  Gazillion Feb 10 '10 at 18:43
    
This resolves the problem for me as long as the input is UTF-8, but the problem persists for other 8-bit encodings. –  eswald Jan 26 '12 at 20:05
    
Great answer - are there any drawbacks in setting locale to an UTF-8 encoding on a whole project instead of just for fgetcsv()? –  Horen May 16 '13 at 8:29

This behaviour has a bug report filed for it, but apparently it isn't a bug.

share|improve this answer
    
it isn't a bug, it's a feature. this must be a joke. –  molli Oct 18 '11 at 14:00

We saw the same result with LANG set to C, and worked around it by ensuring that such values were wrapped in quotation marks. For example, the line

a,"a",é,"é",óú,"óú",ó&ú,"ó&ú"

generates the following array when passed through fgetcsv():

array (
  0 => 'a',
  1 => 'a',
  2 => '',
  3 => 'é',
  4 => '',
  5 => 'óú',
  6 => '&ú',
  7 => 'ó&ú',
)

Of course, you'll have to escape any quotation marks in the value by doubling them, but that's much less hassle than repairing the missing characters.

Oddly, this happens with both UTF-8 and cp1252 encodings for the input file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.