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Can anybody please help me out how to learn using a library, in my example OpenCV for Java by reading the Docs? I mean, I understand from here:

How do i read java documentation?

that a documentation is NOT done to LEARN, but rather to see how to use a method and class etc. But assuming I absolutely need a certain function, the only possible way I guess is to look up the docs. E.g. I'd like to do a HoughTransformation, I google for it with "hough transformation opencv java" and end up on

http://docs.opencv.org/java/org/opencv/imgproc/Imgproc.html#HoughLines(org.opencv.core.Mat, org.opencv.core.Mat, double, double, int)

Okay so far so good. I see how to use it. But how the hell can I understand the return format of the output argument Mat lines? I simply don't know. And as far as I can see there do not exist any big books about using OpenCV in Java and reading examples in C/C++ doesn't help me either because the structure of datatypes etc is different so I can NOT simply adopt those examples in Java.

How to go about this the correct way? Thanks a lot!!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of All Mat supposes a Matrix so should have some idea of how a matrix looks like. And if you look at the MAT documentation as well you might get some general idea of a MAT object representation. Second, if you know what you are doing i.e. understand the domain, then a well written and documented API should make sense. However if you are coming in cold and have little clue about the domain in which you are working in, I would suggest that you write a test program. Simple Program with main, initialize a Imgproc Object. Start passing some meaningful data to the API you want to use. Examine the results you get back whether through a debugger or simply dumping the object output. You could even extend the MAT and Imgproc classes with custom toString fields that can print out some data for you. You could also override some methods and user super to call them then examine their immediate outputs. Bottom line, write a test program, degub, analyze output and errors, step through the code if possible and catch up on your college math since long forgotten, and rinse and repeat.

Technically it for encapsulation reasons. A good API should hide the ugly details about how things are done and only provide you with a simple message that satisfies the parameters that you provide. You can write various test cases to see how it responds. You can surmise how it should function and test those hypothesis. Eventually you will get to a good understanding of how it works. Let say i have an API that says String getFirstName(String lastName) I can easily verify that getFirstName return the FirstName given a LastName. Now let say I have mySpecialClass getFirstName(String lastName); I would have to closely examine mySpecialClass to see what it encapsulates. Could be a map inside with FirstName as key and LastName as value .. for all I know and might only expose getKey and getValue. Not intuitive but if someone had a good reason for thinking this would be best way to represent Names in a certain context .. why not? You either can read the API and understand it or consume it actively and validate your assumptions

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Yeah but I just find it so strange that I need to debug/trial-error the simplest things as I can't find anything about it, no tutorials and/or examples. I know for sure that a Mat is a Matrix, but how exactly the hierarchical structure inside is managed - my part to find it out? I mean why offering a product when the user needs time and time to figure out how to use it!? I somehow find it strange. –  tim Mar 13 at 21:26
    
Technically it for encapsulation reasons. A good API should hide the ugly details about how things are done and only provide you with a simple message that satisfies the parameters that you provide. You can write various test cases to see how it responds. You can surmise how it should function and test those hypothesis. Eventually you will get to a good understanding of how it works. Let say i hav ean API that says String getFirstName(String lastName) I can esaliy verify that getFirstName return the FirstName given a LastName. –  myqyl4 Mar 13 at 21:35
    
Sure, if those are simple datatypes, true. But in my case... I certainly know that the results are organized as a Matrix, but I don't know how exactly. I find it extremly funny somehow that there's nearly now information about it on the internet and I'm wondering how all those guys using OpenCV found out how to do it... Trial&Error everytime really? :( –  tim Mar 13 at 21:41

In the link you provide http://docs.opencv.org/java/org/opencv/imgproc/Imgproc.html#HoughLines%28org.opencv.core.Mat,%20org.opencv.core.Mat,%20double,%20double,%20int%29 it points to the method HoughLines:

public static void HoughLines(Mat image, Mat lines, double rho, double theta, int threshold)

What is inside the parenthesis are not "output arguments" as you called them, but input parameters. This is what you give the function, not what it gives you. What the function returns to you is the type immediately to the left of the function name. In this case, its void, which is nothing.

It takes some parameters that are standard types (double, int) and some that are Mat. Mat is formatted as a link, so if you don't know what that is, click it to see the documentation on the type Mat.

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Thanks yeah, I figured that out already. Now I'm defining the output argument as Mat lines = new Mat() and pass it as second argument. But I can't figure out the exact structure of the output argument lines as it is nowhere mentioned completely. I tried to adopt some parts of this code: roberttadlock.com/blog/2013/7/11/android-and-opencv.html but the access to the element via data = lines.get(0, i); rho = data[0]; theta = data[1]; wasn't working and I have NO INFORMATION at all about how the data is organized. –  tim Mar 13 at 21:21
    
Sorry, yeah I know it's not a OUTPUT-Argument, I mean I know I pass it inside... but still this is the argument (passed probably as reference) where the results are stored in the end. That's why I called it like this to clarify this is the MAT where the results are stored :) –  tim Mar 13 at 21:23
    
I guess you should read all the intro part on docs.opencv.org/java/org/opencv/core/Mat.html and maybe look at the tutorials on docs.opencv.org/doc/tutorials/tutorials.html But the fact is, 3d graphics stuff is complicated. –  developerwjk Mar 13 at 21:25
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When you can't figure out how to use a library from the Java docs, and they have no decent tutorials, that's when its time to abandon it and just find a different library. –  developerwjk Mar 13 at 21:28
    
I'm not into 3d graphics. And yeah I read tutorials and I even have a book, but it's like the tutorials written in C++ and I can't easily adopt the tutorials as the structure and data is organized differently in java... :( Edit: Yeah maybe I need to abandon it but I thought as Opencv is such a widely used library this is the way to go as it offers so much functionality, reliable computation etc... –  tim Mar 13 at 21:28

To complete myqyl4's answer, in the specific case of OpenCV it helps to know that C++ is the base of OpenCV. Java, Android and Python versions are for the most part wrappers of C++ code.

C++ code is documented in much more detail. For example Mat:

http://docs.opencv.org/modules/core/doc/basic_structures.html#mat

So for the Java Mat class, you can always check its source code (its quite simple, a Mat is basically composed by the fields width, height, type and the actual data), and everything it is not there is what it is described by the C++ documentation. The Mat types are described in great detail in the C++ docs.

To access a Mat data you might check this SO answer.

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