Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We all know you can't do this:

for (Object i : l) {
    if (condition(i))
        l.remove(i);
}

ConcurrentModificationException etc... this apparently works sometimes, but not always. Here's some specific code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Collection<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    for (int i=0; i < 10; ++i) {
        l.add(new Integer(4));
        l.add(new Integer(5));
        l.add(new Integer(6));
    }

    for (Integer i : l) {
        if (i.intValue() == 5)
            l.remove(i);
    }

    System.out.println(l);
}

This, of course, results in:

Exception in thread "main" java.util.ConcurrentModificationException

... even though multiple threads aren't doing it... Anyway.

What's the best solution to this problem? How can I remove an item from the collection in a loop without throwing this exception?

I'm also using an arbitrary Collection here, not necessarily an ArrayList, so you can't rely on get.

share|improve this question
    
I doubt, you can have both time and space efficiency with a better Logic , no? –  vivek_jonam Feb 20 '13 at 11:35

11 Answers 11

up vote 562 down vote accepted

Iterator.remove() is safe, you can use it like this:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

// This is a clever way to create the iterator and call iterator.hasNext() like
// you would do in a while-loop. It would be the same as doing:
//     Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator();
//     while (iterator.hasNext()) {
for (Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator(); iterator.hasNext();) {
    String string = iterator.next();
    if (string.isEmpty()) {
        // Remove the current element from the iterator and the list.
        iterator.remove();
    }
}

Note that Iterator.remove is the only safe way to modify a collection during iteration; the behavior is unspecified if the underlying collection is modified in any other way while the iteration is in progress.

Source:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/collections/interfaces/collection.html

share|improve this answer
37  
wasn't aware this functionality was there. I usually copy the list and iterate over the copy. –  Mike Brown Oct 21 '08 at 23:30
2  
What if you want to remove an element other than the element returned in the current iteration? –  Eugen Apr 22 '13 at 9:51
    
You have to use the .remove in the iterator and that is only able to remove the current element, so no :) –  Bill K Apr 22 '13 at 18:00
    
Be aware that this is slower compared to using ConcurrentLinkedDeque or CopyOnWriteArrayList (at least in my case) –  Dan Oct 24 at 1:43
    
you are missing a ; after iterator.remove() ;) –  ZirconCode Nov 3 at 13:31

Silly me:

Iterator<Integer> iter = l.iterator();
while (iter.hasNext()) {
    if (iter.next().intValue() == 5) {
        iter.remove();
    }
}

I assumed that since a foreach loop is syntactic sugar for iterating, using an iterator wouldn't help... but it gives you this .remove() functionality.

share|improve this answer
18  
foreach loop is syntactic sugar for iterating. However as you pointed out, you need to call remove on the iterator - which foreach doesn't give you access to. Hence the reason why you can't remove in a foreach loop (even though you are actually using an iterator under the hood) –  madlep Oct 21 '08 at 23:30
    
I think you should accept Bill K's answer. –  matt b Oct 22 '08 at 14:30
30  
+1 for example code to use iter.remove() in context, which Bill K's answer does not [directly] have. –  Eddified Oct 3 '12 at 17:01
    
I am removing iterator as you did here but I still keep getting same error. Any idea? –  Gokhan Arik May 6 at 1:49

Since the question has been already answered i.e. the best way is to use the remove method of the iterator object, I would go into the specifics of the place where the error "java.util.ConcurrentModificationException" is thrown.

Every collection class has a private class which implements the Iterator interface and provides methods like next(), remove() and hasNext().

The code for next looks something like this...

public E next() {
    checkForComodification();
    try {
        E next = get(cursor);
        lastRet = cursor++;
        return next;
    } catch(IndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
        checkForComodification();
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    }
}

Here the method checkForComodification is implemented as

final void checkForComodification() {
    if (modCount != expectedModCount)
        throw new ConcurrentModificationException();
}

So, as you can see, if you explicitly try to remove an element from the collection. It results in modCount getting different from expectedModCount, resulting in the exception "ConcurrentModificationException".

share|improve this answer

You can either use the iterator directly like you mentioned, or else keep a second collection and add each item you want to remove to the new collection, then removeAll at the end. This allows you to keep using the type-safety of the for-each loop at the cost of increased memory use and cpu time (shouldn't be a huge problem unless you have really, really big lists or a really old computer)

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Collection<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    Collection<Integer> itemsToRemove = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    for (int i=0; i < 10; ++i) {
    l.add(new Integer(4));
    l.add(new Integer(5));
    l.add(new Integer(6));
    }
    for (Integer i : l)
    {
        if (i.intValue() == 5)
            itemsToRemove.add(i);
    }

    l.removeAll(itemsToRemove);
    System.out.println(l);
}
share|improve this answer
5  
this is what i normally do, but the explicit iterator is a more elgant solution i feel. –  Claudiu Oct 21 '08 at 23:51
1  
Fair enough, as long as you aren't doing anything else with the iterator - having it exposed makes it easier to do things like call .next() twice per loop etc. Not a huge problem, but can cause issues if you are doing anything more complicated than just running through a list to delete entries. –  RodeoClown Oct 21 '08 at 23:58
    
@RodeoClown: in the original question, Claudiu is removing from the Collection, not the iterator. –  matt b Oct 22 '08 at 14:29
1  
Removing from the iterator removes from the underlying collection... but what I was saying in the last comment is that if you are doing anything more complicated than just looking for deletes in the loop (like processing correct data) using the iterator can make some errors easier to make. –  RodeoClown Oct 22 '08 at 18:35
    
If it is a simple delete values that aren't needed and the loop is only doing that one thing, using the iterator directly and calling .remove() is absolutely fine. –  RodeoClown Oct 22 '08 at 18:36

With Java 8 you can use the new removeIf method. Applied to your example:

Collection<Integer> coll = new ArrayList<Integer>();
//populate

coll.removeIf(i -> i.intValue() == 5);
share|improve this answer
8  
Ahh Java... finally adding filter only 56 years after Lisp. –  Claudiu May 28 at 13:00

Same answer as Claudius with a for loop:

for (Iterator<Object> it = objects.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    Object object = it.next();
    if (test) {
        it.remove();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In GS Collections, the method removeIf defined on MutableCollection will work:

MutableList<Integer> list = Lists.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
list.removeIf(Predicates.lessThan(3));
Assert.assertEquals(Lists.mutable.of(3, 4, 5), list);

In Java 8 with Lambda support this can be written as follows:

MutableList<Integer> list = Lists.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
list.removeIf(integer -> integer < 3);
Assert.assertEquals(Lists.mutable.of(3, 4, 5), list);

Note: I am a developer on GS Collections

share|improve this answer

Make a copy of existing list and iterate over new copy.

for (String str : new ArrayList<String>(listOfStr))     
{
    listOfStr.remove(/* object reference or index */);
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Making a copy sounds like a waste of resources. –  Antzi Aug 21 '13 at 12:35

I have a suggestion for the problem above. No need of secondary list or any extra time. Please find an example which would do the same stuff but in a different way.

//"list" is ArrayList<Object>
//"state" is some boolean variable, which when set to true, Object will be removed from the list
int index = 0;
while(index < list.size()) {
    Object r = list.get(index);
    if( state ) {
        list.remove(index);
        index = 0;
        continue;
    }
    index += 1;
}

This would avoid the Concurrency Exception.

share|improve this answer
    
The question explicitly states, that the OP is not necessary using ArrayList and thus cannot rely on get(). Otherwise probably a good approach, though. –  kaskelotti Apr 13 at 11:09

In such cases a common trick is (was?) to go backwards:

for(int i = l.size() - 1; i >= 0; i --) {
  if (l.get(i) == 5) {
    l.remove(i);
  }
}

That said, I'm more than happy that you have better ways in Java 8, e.g. removeIf or filter on streams.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good trick. But it wouldn't work on non-indexed collections like sets, and it'd be really slow on say linked lists. –  Claudiu Aug 29 at 16:12
    
@Claudiu Yes, this is definitely just for ArrayLists or similar collections. –  Landei Aug 30 at 15:47

this might not be the best way, but for most of the small cases this should acceptable:

"create a second empty-array and add only the ones you want to keep"

I don't remeber where I read this from... for justiness I will make this wiki in hope someone finds it or just to don't earn rep I don't deserve.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.