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Anybody any ideas how to achieve this I want this effect

<table>
  <tr><td width=100></td><td width=100></td></tr>
</table>

I can do it with float, or position absolute, but can it be done without these two?

share|improve this question
2  
Strange requirement - why don't you want to use those? – Mike Robinson Feb 10 '10 at 18:43
    
May want to ask doctype.com. – Steve Tjoa Feb 10 '10 at 18:43
1  
Could you explain your problem a bit further? You're trying to create 2-columns layout or what? Maybe CSS display property with value table[-row|-cell] will be fine? – Crozin Feb 10 '10 at 18:54
    
Let me explain why i need it, its for wml and and they don't allow tables according to w3c, yes i can make tables with divs, tables etc. but haven't found proper solution for CSS without float or position ( float isnt allowed either ) – Grumpy Feb 11 '10 at 10:24
    
css3 has a solution for it -moz-column-count: 2; -webkit-column-count: 2; but is not widely supported yet – Grumpy Feb 11 '10 at 10:31

make use of a list displayed inline, fix margin and padding and it should work well. This will allow you to have more that two columns if you want to expand later.

<ul>
<li>First column</li>
<li>Second Column</li>
</ul>

CSS

li
{
display:inline;
}

Don't forget to put enough margin/padding to make it look better.

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1  
It's a better idea to make use of display: inline-block if you want to define width/height on your columns – Anzeo Dec 6 '12 at 8:24
    
Yes, use inline-block, but remember that IE 6-7 only supports inline-block on elements that are originally inline. – purefusion Jul 24 '13 at 13:41
<div style="display:table;">
    <div style="display:table-cell;"></div>
    <div style="display:table-cell;"></div>
</div>

of course except IE

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Tables should only be used for tabular information, you should avoid using tables for creating layouts, instead you should use DIV-based layouts. See my answer here for more details about this. Since you have asked for a solution without floats, position (which means divs), the only other option we are left with is tables, so here is how you might go on to creating table based two column layout.

 <table width="60%" border="1" align="center">
 <tr>
  <td width="50%" align="left">
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td>Colume One</td>
      </tr>
    </table>    
  </td>

  <td width="50%" align="left">
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td>Colume Two</td>
      </tr>
    </table>    
  </td>

 </tr>
</table>

Again, using tables for layouts is not a good idea :)

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5  
Tables are designed for tabular data - nothing more. – Crozin Feb 10 '10 at 18:51
    
@Crozin: so quick man: read the title of the question again: I can do it with float, or position absolute, but can it be done without these two? He needs div-less solution which means tables. Think Again Please !!!!!!!!!! – Sarfraz Feb 10 '10 at 18:53
    
@Crozin: and i know what tables are supposed to do, see my score for this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2235029/should-i-use-table-or-ul/…. I have already answered this, so i know what it is all about, the quetioner needed table-based solution. Thanks again !!!!!! – Sarfraz Feb 10 '10 at 18:54
    
Either my sarcasm detector is in dire need of complete re-calibration or this is the single most... ehm... bewildering answer I have seen all day. – ЯegDwight Feb 10 '10 at 18:56
2  
If he need table-like behaviour he's supposed to use CSS display property (yeah, I know IE6 doesn't support it well). Using tables for layout design is wrong - it's evil - especially nested tables. btw: width, border, align - that should be moved to CSS. – Crozin Feb 10 '10 at 18:57
up vote -2 down vote accepted

found a solution css3 has a solution for it -moz-column-count: 2; -webkit-column-count: 2; but is not widely supported yet

share|improve this answer
    
why is it down voted? – Grumpy Jan 10 '15 at 11:37

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