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I really don't have the idea on why I am getting 0 value on this:

enter image description here

But this code works well:

int val = Convert.ToInt32("1546");    

Here is the appsetting:

<add key="PesoPayMerchantId" value="​1546"/>

Any idea?

Edit1

I want to get the integer value of "1546", but it fails to work.
Here is the code for getting appsetting:

    public static string GetConfigurationString(string appSettingValue)
    {
        return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings[appSettingValue];
    }  

I have tried your suggestions, and this is the result:

enter image description here
enter image description here
enter image description here

The string value is correct ("1546"), but it can't be parse to integer. What is happening here?

Edit 2

I am very sure that the value of:

<add key="PesoPayMerchantId" value="​1546"/>  

is really a combination of numbers "1546"
But when I try to re-write the string value using Immediate Window it can now be parsed. But still I can't figure out the very reason of this Bug?

enter image description here

Edit 3

Finally, it works now, thanks to Johnny

What I did is, I re-write the whole, <add key="PesoPayMerchantId" value="1546"/> and it can now be parsed. Thanks for all your help. :D

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1  
you are sure that id is 0 from the PesoPayMerchantId return value? Are you running this from a Release build? The debug bits misalign easily when things are optimized. –  payo Mar 14 at 5:12
1  
You should always check bool TryParse() result. –  nuclear sweet Mar 14 at 5:13
1  
If TryParse fails the id value will be zero, so you should check if TryParse() is true upon execution. –  George Mar 14 at 5:20
1  
Did you use mutithreading? Also change int.TryParse with double.TryParse and show result. –  nuclear sweet Mar 14 at 5:21
3  
@fiberOptics I think there might be something in the string, and that is why you should re-type the whole value string. With the I-beam staying within the string (say between 15 and 46), then if you hold the Alt key and press 1, 2, 7, an invisible DEL char is inserted, and the same problem will occur. In this case, I won't call it a "bug". –  Johnny Mar 14 at 6:59
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The answer would be, re-write the config.
As I remember, I just copied and paste "1546" from a pdf file.
So lesson learned, don't be too lazy on typing values.

Additional Information:
I also remember that, I did copy and paste on gmail (google Chrome) and I found out that the text I copied contains hidden characters at the beginning.

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2  
I don't think you are too lazy, Its a long question to write !!! :p –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Mar 14 at 10:58
1  
Copy/paste from PDF can be problematic. Maybe worth mentioning viewer/OS - I have had similar problems with evince document viewer under Linux. –  Brian Drummond Mar 14 at 12:13
1  
LOL! Now I know the reason. Because you copy, the quotation mark is different from typing and it's not acceptable in config file. –  Forte_201092 Mar 14 at 14:19
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I can only think that you are experiencing some kind of weird globalization / Culture specific problem.

Given that you know the exact format of the number, you might try the Int32.TryParse Method (String, NumberStyles, IFormatProvider, Int32) overload, e.g.:

int.TryParse(val, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out id);
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I would inspect the return value of Try.Parse.

From documentation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f02979c7(v=vs.110).aspx

      int number;
      bool result = Int32.TryParse(value, out number);
      if (result)
      {
         Console.WriteLine("Converted '{0}' to {1}.", value, number);         
      }
      else
      {
         if (value == null) value = ""; 
         Console.WriteLine("Attempted conversion of '{0}' failed.", value);
      }
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2  
I agree with this approach more as the Boolean return will let you know if the parsing failed or not, the 0 could just be the default value because the parsing failed or it could in actual fact be "0" that is converted into 0. –  dandrejvv Mar 14 at 5:22
1  
@TGH the result is false, but why? –  fiberOptics Mar 14 at 5:31
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This test Assert's always correctly:

namespace SOWTests
{
    using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

    [TestClass]
    public class PTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void PTest()
        {
            string val = "1546";

            int id;
            int.TryParse(val, out id);

            Assert.AreEqual(1546, id);
        }
    }
}

So problem not in this part of code. It's maybe altered by some debugging/profiling part of your code. Or maybe there some stack corruption from unmanaged call.

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