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I have transparent block on top of iframe and when I click on that block I want to hide it and that click should be transmitted to iframe. In js fiddle it is youtube embed video, so I need it to start playing. This has nothing to do with youtube API, it's there just for example.

HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <iframe width="853" height="480" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ASO_zypdnsQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    <div id="hideme"></div>
</div>

CSS:

#wrapper{
    position: relative;
}
#hideme{
    width: 853px;
    height: 480px;
    position: absolute;
    opacity: 0.0;
    z-index: 100;
}
iframe{
    position: absolute;
}

JS:

$(document).ready(function(){
    var button = $('#ok');
    $('#hideme').on('click', function(event){
        $(this).hide(); 
        $('iframe').trigger('click', event);
    });
    button.click(function(){
        alert('You pushed the button!');
    });
});

Here is jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ZL8ut/

share|improve this question
1  
Sounds like clickjacking ;-) –  alexP Mar 14 at 7:28
    
Yeah, you really should avoid layering clickable elements just as a rule. It's an incredibly devious way to exploit visitors and many browsers and security plug-ins will try to prevent it, even if you can get it working in a local test. –  Anthony Mar 14 at 8:10
    
Well, there are lot of more efficient methods for clickjacking I guess. What I'm trying to do is opposite. It's just that some video providers have their own players and when user wants for example just to pause video embedded on my page - player opens a new page. All I want is to avoid this. –  Dmitry Mikhaylov Mar 14 at 8:29

2 Answers 2

There is a trick way to do that: on your click function you can use:

$('iframe').attr('src', $('iframe').attr('src') + '?autoplay=1');

Here is a Working JSFiddle based on your own.

I hope it's what you wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
Since it has to reload the iframe, that might look funky to the visitor, but this is a much smarter and safer approach over actually passing the event to a different element. –  Anthony Mar 14 at 8:13
    
It actually uses youtube player API. I tried to clarify in question that youtube video is there only for example. –  Dmitry Mikhaylov Mar 14 at 8:25
    
Yeah but I thought this was working for other players than Youtube... Apparently not... –  Rofez Mar 14 at 8:31

just .trigger('click'); works

$('#hideme').on('click', function(event){
    $(this).hide(); 
    $('iframe').trigger('click');
});
button.click(function(){
    alert('You pushed the button!');
});
//test by this
$("iframe").on("click", function(){
alert("clicked");
})

Demo Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
No, it doesn't. –  Dmitry Mikhaylov Mar 14 at 8:32
    
@DmitryMikhaylov when you click on aaa alert is called or not –  Vinay Pratap Singh Mar 14 at 8:35
    
Yeah, it works. But you have just removed all css styles. –  Dmitry Mikhaylov Mar 14 at 8:39
    
@DmitryMikhaylov yeah your all css was giving me nothing to click upon so i removed it. –  Vinay Pratap Singh Mar 14 at 8:40
    
the whole question was about that actually. I was asking people if I could hide this #hideme block and that automatically click again. –  Dmitry Mikhaylov Mar 14 at 8:44

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