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To steal a bit from a pointer I want to set its last bit. I can do it using compare_exchange_weak as shown below

int x = 5;
std::atomic<int*> iptr;
iptr.store(&x);
int *expected, *desired;
do {
    expected = iptr.load();
    desired = (int*)((uintptr_t)iptr.load() | 0x1);
} while (!iptr.compare_exchange_weak(expected, desired, std::memory_order_release,     std::memory_order_relaxed));

However it seems that this is not an efficient way as CAS will be too costly along with the atomic load and the associated calculation with typecasting etc. I would have preferred to do it using fetch_or or test_and_set like below

int x = 5;
std::atomic<int*> iptr;
iptr.store(&x);
iptr.operator|=((int*)1);

But it does not compile as operator|= is not a member of std::atomic integer pointer type. Is there some way out to do it efficiently?

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Err, have you considered what may happen if someone tries to use that pointer you're fiddling with. Or the fact that there's no inherent reason why new itself may not return odd pointers. –  paxdiablo Mar 14 '14 at 8:14
    
@paxdiablo Yes I have. When retrieving value from there I clear the bit after loading it. To address the second ques I can use hazard pointer method which I am still to implement..:) –  BapiC Mar 14 '14 at 8:17

1 Answer 1

std::atomic<T*> class provide only atomic inc/dec pointer operations. If you want more complicated atomic operation, it can build with compare-and-swap(CAS) loop.

When CAS operaton fails, 1st argument of atomic::compare_exchange_weak are updated latest value. So CAS loop can be little simplified. (omit memory_order for explanation)

std::atomic<int*> iptr;

int *expected, *desired;
expected = iptr.load();
do {
  desired = (int*)((uintptr_t)expected | 0x1);
} while (!iptr.compare_exchange_weak(expected, desired));
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