Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Apologies for the title, suggestions to make it clearer are welcome.

I have created a module (we'll denote this by M) which, when included inside a class, will cause it to obtain new class methods and instance methods (Apologies if my terminology is incorrect). This is achieved by = class F including the A::ModuleInstanceMethods module in the code below.

Now that I've done that, I am trying to create a new module (we'll call this new module M') which includes the module M, such that when M' is included in a class, the class should gain the appropriate class and instance methods as per class F. This is where I get stuck. Examples of such a class is G in the code below.

I'd also like classes which include module M'' (module M'' will includes M') to have the same functionality. An example will be class H in the code below. The same should go for classes which include M''' (which itself includes M''), classes which M'''' (which itself includes M'''), and so on. It's pretty similar to an inheritance hierarchy.

If my textual explanation is confusing, do read the code below. In particular, I'd like to resolve the failures caused by calling G.class_method_one and H.class_method_one, but I lack the knowledge to do so.

I know it is possible to just extend the A::ModuleClassMethods module in the classes that I'm interested in, but I wish to avoid doing this. The same could also be achieved by manually adding the portion of the self.included function in A::ModuleInstanceMethods with the base.instance_of? Class, but if possible I'd like to do it programatically instead of copying and pasting the same code in many different sites.

module A
  module ModuleClassMethods
    def class_method_one
      2
    end
  end

  module ModuleInstanceMethods
    def instance_method_one
      3
    end

    def self.included(base)
      if base.instance_of? Class
        base.extend(A::ModuleClassMethods)
      elsif base.instance_of? Module
        # Intended functionality:
        # When modules that `include` A::ModuleInstanceMethods are themselves
        # included in a class (such as module `A::D` included in class `F`),
        # class `F` will get the functions defined in the A::ModuleClassMethods
        # module as class level methods
      end
    end
  end

  module D
    include A::ModuleInstanceMethods
  end

  module E
    include D
  end
end

class F
  include A::ModuleInstanceMethods
end

class G
  include A::D
end

class H
  include A::E
end

F.class_method_one # 2
F.new.instance_method_one # 3

G.new.instance_method_one # 3
# below statement fails
# G.class_method_one

H.new.instance_method_one # 3
# below statement fails
# H.class_method_one

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
I wish to avoid using extend. Why? Sounds like the easiest, cleanest way to solve your problem. –  Matheus Moreira Mar 14 '14 at 10:35
    
extend is the easiest way to solve the problem. I was about to say it may not be the cleanest way until I saw your comment on my answer. I think you are right on this one. –  yanhan Mar 14 '14 at 10:46

1 Answer 1

I've seem to have figured it out. This solution makes use of module_eval. For modules, it adds a self.included function which calls A::ModuleInstanceMethods.included. I wouldn't mind learning about more elegant solutions.

module A
  module ModuleClassMethods
    def class_method_one
      2
    end
  end

  module ModuleInstanceMethods
    def instance_method_one
      3
    end

    def self.included(base)
      if base.instance_of? Class
        base.extend(A::ModuleClassMethods)
      elsif base.instance_of? Module
        base.module_eval {
          def self.included(base)
            A::ModuleInstanceMethods.included(base)
          end
        }
      end
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
This can and probably will cause problems. The user of your module might want to define his own included hook. Either yours will override the user's, or the user's will override yours. One can hack around that, but I wonder if there is a better way. Also, look into Object#define_singleton_method. –  Matheus Moreira Mar 14 '14 at 10:41
    
You have a very good point; I didnt think of that. +1 –  yanhan Mar 14 '14 at 10:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.