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I've written a command which could be compared to time or timeout in that it's used at the start of the line as a prefix to any other bash command. My question is, how do I convince my bash completion script/rule to run the normal completion for the subcommand - exactly as it would do if my prefix command wasn't present?

E.g. the current situation is:

$ svn [tab]     - lists the svn commands

and:

$ mything svn [tab]  - my completion needs to hand-over to svn's completion

but svn in the example above may be pretty much any bash command.

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Does it need to return to yourthing after svn's completion? If not, exec svn. –  Mark Setchell Mar 14 at 10:06
    
And of course I've answered my own question! If I do "complete -p | grep time" then I can see how that command does it - I just need to define a completion rule as follows: complete -o filenames -F _command myprefix Simple! Now I just need to figure out how on Earth time ensures that this completion rule is set up in the first place... –  Sarev of Aona Mar 14 at 10:11
    
I think all I actually have to do is put my complete line into an otherwise empty file, called mything, and install (copy) it into /etc/bash_completion.d/. –  Sarev of Aona Mar 14 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As per my comments above, I've answered my own question!

After doing "complete -p | grep time", we can see how that command does it - you just need to define a completion rule as follows:

complete -o filenames -F _command mything

and put it into an otherwise empty a file called /etc/bash_completion.d/mything. When you open a new bash terminal, you should then find that your mything command can complete any subcommands in the normal manner.

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