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Well the title says it all.I would like to find a regex that allows me to match the remaining decimals after the 4 first decimals. For the moment I've figured out how to match the number and the 4 first decimals.

^\d+\.\d{0,4}$

but it's the remaining figures that I would like to match on negative and positive numbers.

45.46867431 ---> returns 7431.
5.34 ---> returns nothing.
0.0015 ---> returns nothing.
-135.6584312315 ---> returns 312315.
0.008951 returns ---> returns 51.

I need it to be a regex because it's to clean files, not to format it direclty with a script.

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Which regex engine? –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 14 '14 at 13:59
1  
@TimPietzcker you always ask this question and answer OPs question before us –  aelor Mar 14 '14 at 14:01
    
Do you need to validate the string? I.e., should the regex reject matching 5678 in the string foo12345678? Can you access the contents of capturing groups, or only the entire match? –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 14 '14 at 14:03
    
No I'm not using any regex engine, Im cleaning geoJSON files that show way too much decimals in wsg84, and my editor is sublime text, it allows to select in files with regex...I must say, I often ask and try to answer questions on stack-overflow. And I never get answered as fast as when it concerns regex...You guys are probably the most reactive part of this community. @aelor I used yours it works great, divided weight of my files by 2 –  HowTo Mar 16 '14 at 1:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
(?<=\.\d{4})\d+

this should do the trick.

demo here : http://regex101.com/r/eW8fR6

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This will return you the digits after the dot and four digits.

^-?\d+\.\d{4}(\d+)$

Assuming there will be no input like .102123

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