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I'm trying to write code that checks if an array is sorted, homework says it must be in a method with a boolean return, but if I put the return inside of the for loop it stops the for loop before it can check more than just the first two digits in the list. And either way, even if I put the returns within the loop eclipse tells me that there is no boolean return in the method? I'm not sure how to get it to work and can't find anything similar online please help :)

public static boolean isSorted (double [] list) {
    for (int i=1; i<list.length; i++) {
        if (list[(int) i-1] > list[(int) i] ) {
            System.out.println("Not Sorted");
            return false;
        }
        else {
            return true;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Take out the return true from the else block, if the whole loop doesn't return false, then returning true is implicitly the other condition and eclipse won't moan. Secondly, you don't need to check the whole array, because if it's not sorted, then checking until the first pair that isn't in order is fine. –  SBI Mar 14 at 14:21
    
"returning true is implicitly the other condition" No, it isn't. –  David Conrad Mar 14 at 15:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted
public static boolean isSorted(double[] list) {

    for (int i = 1; i < list.length; i++) {
        if (list[i - 1] > list[i]) {
            System.out.println("Not Sorted");
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Try this code. You will return true in the end if it is sorted

share|improve this answer
2  
that's the best solution so far. –  zmo Mar 14 at 14:22
2  
it'd be nice if you added an explanation on why the OP's code is wrong, so not only he can see a good code, but also learn from it! ;-) –  zmo Mar 14 at 14:24
    
she can learn from it**** :) –  maribov Mar 14 at 14:31
1  
I tried this it works great, thank you :) –  maribov Mar 14 at 14:32
    
You can also check another solutions which have been mentioned below. I reckon that most of them work perfectly ;) –  ruhungry Mar 14 at 14:34

This is just for providing an alternate answer to the ones discussed here. I see the benefit in learning the iterative version first, but the logic can be abstracted to something like this:

public static boolean isSorted(double[] list) {
    return Arrays.equals(list, Arrays.sort(list));
}
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2  
This algorithm has O(n log n) running time at best. A better solution exists in O(n). –  IceArdor Mar 14 at 15:25
    
I doubt that any of that is the concern of the question. Instead, it's about learning the logic behind what you're doing, and this says much more about what the code does when you read it :) –  SBI Mar 14 at 15:27
    
I'll go over to adding a disclaimer posting production code or not. –  SBI Mar 14 at 15:32

Just traverse array and if you find that list[i] > list[i+1], return false. It can be done at the following way:

public static boolean isSorted (double [] list){

    for(int i=0; i<list.length-1; i++){
        if (list[i] > list[i+1]){
            System.out.println("Not Sorted");
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

public static boolean isSorted (double [] list){

    boolean result = true;

    for(int i=1; i<list.length; i++) {
        if (list[i-1] > list[i]) {
            System.out.println("Not Sorted");
            result = false;
            break;
        }
    }

    return result;

}
share|improve this answer
2  
You are doing unnecessary iterations. If you found that list[i-1] > list[i], no need to test the next pairs of elements in the array. –  ZouZou Mar 14 at 14:21
1  
And unnecessary casts. –  CompuChip Mar 14 at 14:22
    
@Vitkinov you don't need to continue looking at the array if you've found it's not sorted –  nikis Mar 14 at 14:25
    
@CompuChip: Fixed that. –  Crystal Meth Mar 14 at 14:29
    
Good point about the additional iterations. You can actually just return false instead of using the intermediate result variable. –  CompuChip Mar 14 at 14:30

Is this a school project? Then I don't think your teacher likes to see you use a for-loop if you break it at a certain point. Use a while loop instead.

public static boolean isSorted (double [] list) {
    boolean sorted = true;
    int i = 1;
    while (i < list.length && sorted) { 
        sorted = (list[i-1] > list[i]);
        i++;
    }
    return sorted;  
}

Not tested though, you might have to fine-tune the i.

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The main issue here is: the compiler cannot check whether the for-loop is entered. If the list is empty, the function will indeed return nothing! And therefore is in conflict with the promise to return a boolean. That is why the proposed answers above work: they always return a boolean if the for-loop finished (or did not run at all).

share|improve this answer
public static boolean isSorted (double [] list){
    boolean isSorted=true;
    for(int i=1; i<list.length; i++){
        if (list[i] > list[i+1]){
        System.out.println("Not Sorted");
        isSorted = false;
    }
    }
    return isSorted;
}
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