Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am stuck with a query where one table has many records of the same id and the columns have different values like this:

ID  Name Location  Daysdue  date
001 MINE NBI       120      13-FEB-2013
001 TEST MSA       111      14-FEB-2013
002 MINE NBI       13       13-FEB-2013
002 MINE MSA       104      15-FEB-2013

I want to return the one record with the highest days due, so I have written a query:

select id,max(daysdue),name,location,date group by id,name,location,date;

This query is not returning one record but several for each id because I have grouped with every column bearing that the columns are different. What is the best way to select the row with the largest value of Days due based on id irrespective of the other values in the other columns??

For example I want to return this as:

001 MINE NBI       120      13-FEB-2013
002 MINE MSA       104      15-FEB-2013
share|improve this question
    
Any unique field? –  Mihai Mar 14 '14 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It appears that you want something like

SELECT *
  FROM (SELECT t.*,
               rank() over (partition by id
                                order by daysDue desc) rnk
          FROM table_name t)
 WHERE rnk = 1

Depending on how you want to handle ties (two rows with the same id and the same daysDue), you may want the dense_rank or row_number function rather than rank.

share|improve this answer
    
If I have two records having the same number of daysOverdue, then this query is returning Both records –  ErrorNotFoundException Mar 14 '14 at 14:45
    
@Stanley how to decide which record to return then? –  Daniel Sparing Mar 14 '14 at 14:46
1  
@Stanley - Correct. And that's why I asked about how you want to handle ties. You could pick one row arbitrarily by using the row_number function rather than rank. You could add additional criteria to the order by in the rank to ensure that you can choose a particular row. –  Justin Cave Mar 14 '14 at 14:47
    
I just need to return one row as I want to count the Number of rows. The query can return any of the ties rows. –  ErrorNotFoundException Mar 14 '14 at 14:55
    
@Stanley - If you want to arbitrarily pick one row, use row_number in place of rank. If you're just going to count the rows, though, you'd really just want to do a select count( dsitinct id ) from table_name. –  Justin Cave Mar 14 '14 at 14:57

First you need to find the MAX(daysdue) for each ID:

SELECT
    ID,
    MAX(daysdue) AS max_daysdue
FROM table
GROUP BY ID;

Then you can join your original table to this.

SELECT t.* 
FROM
    table t
    JOIN (
        SELECT
            ID,
            MAX(daysdue) AS max_daysdue
        FROM table
        GROUP BY ID
    ) m ON
        t.ID = m.ID
        AND t.daysdue = m.max_daysdue;

Note that you might have duplicate id's in case of a tie -- makes sense semantically I guess.

share|improve this answer
    
Id is not Unique –  ErrorNotFoundException Mar 14 '14 at 14:40
    
@Stanley I didn't assume it was unique. How does the result of this query differ from your expected result? –  Daniel Sparing Mar 14 '14 at 14:47
    
This still gives me duplicate records. I do not have any unique column :( –  ErrorNotFoundException Mar 14 '14 at 14:57
SELECT 
  id,daysdue,name,location,date 
FROM your_table 
  WHERE daysdue = (
    SELECT max(daysdue) FROM your_table
  );
share|improve this answer
    
I almost guessed that –  sqlab Mar 14 '14 at 18:08

You could always select where rownum = 1 then order by daysdue descending, this will give you the highest daysdue result.

 select id,daysdue,name,location,date where ROWNUM =1 group by id,name,location,date 
share|improve this answer
1  
"Top 1" is not valid syntax in Oracle. –  Justin Cave Mar 14 '14 at 14:38
    
Yes top 1 is not valid :( –  ErrorNotFoundException Mar 14 '14 at 14:40
    
Modified it to pick out ROWNUM = 1 instead, my apologies. –  Paranoid Android Mar 14 '14 at 14:40
    
I disagree. It should provide the desired output. –  Paranoid Android Mar 14 '14 at 14:43
    
It gives me only one row for the entire query :P –  ErrorNotFoundException Mar 14 '14 at 15:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.