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Whenever an object is constructed, should the constructor always leave it in an "initialised" state?

For example, if an Image class has two constructors where one takes a file path string, and the other takes no parameters, is it bad practice for the latter to leave the image object in an invalid state?

Assuming the class is written to handle both states.

I ask this because I find it almost necessary to have a default construct in a lot of cases. Especially when an object is a member of a class and you want to initialise it IN the constructor of that class.

EDIT: I am aware of the member initialiser list. I have found a few situations where I would like to construct the object DURING the constructor of the class it is held in, not before. Although, I understand that this could potentially be more dangerous than any other alternative.

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Yes generally it should be, however there are cases where it is not possible or feasible. Regarding your concern: For such cases member initialization lists exist. If you define one, your member wont be default constructed anymore (only if the member appears in the list ofc). –  Paranaix Mar 14 at 15:13
    
consider use static factory method for construction, that way you can return invalid object like boost::optional<Image>. –  yngum Mar 14 at 15:14
    
In you case, should the Image class contain the loading of the image? Is the path part of an image class? –  Max Mar 14 at 15:16
    
Yes, that's what I was thinking in that example. The load should be part of the image class. –  Ben Mar 14 at 15:21
3  
If the class is written to handle both states, then neither is invalid. Maybe one is less useful than another, but still not invalid. –  user645280 Mar 14 at 15:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It all boils down to the definition of a "valid state": if the methods of your class handle the state when the path is empty, then the state with the empty path is a valid state, and is definitely acceptable.

This may not be optimal from the coding perspective, though, because potentially you might need to add multiple checks for the path to be valid. You can often manage complexity by implementing the State Pattern.

I find it almost necessary to have a default construct in a lot of cases. Especially when an object is a member of a class and you want to initialise it IN the constructor of that class.

You do not need a default constructor in order to initialize an object in the constructor of the class of which it is a member, as long as you construct the dependent in the initialization list.

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But how would I deal with this if I wanted to do work in the constructor, in order to initialise that object? –  Ben Mar 14 at 15:19
1  
@Ben If possible, make a private static function that does "the work" that you planned to do in the constructor, and call that function inside the initialization list. Say, you want to normalize the name before passing it to dependent's constructor. You can do this: owner(string path) : dependent(normalize(path)) {}, where dependent(string) expects a normalized path, and static normalize(string) does the work. I realize that this may not always be possible, but very often it is. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 14 at 15:23
    
That's a good idea. Still doesn't solve a few problems( like passing a pointer created in the private static method into the constructor of the object ), but that does help in A LOT of situations. Thanks. –  Ben Mar 14 at 15:29

Yes, it should always be valid. However, it is usually not very well defined what makes the object valid. At the very least, the object should be usable in a way without crashing. This, however, does not mean that all operations can be performed on the object, but there should be at least one. In many cases, that's just assignment from another source (e.g. std container iterators) and destruction (this one is mandatory, even after a move). But there more operations the objects supports in any kind of state, the less prone to error it will be.

It is usually a trade-off. If you can get away with objects only having states where all operations are valid, that's certainly great. However, those cases are rare, and if you have to jump through hoops to get there, it's usually easier to just add and document preconditions to some of its functionality. In some cases, you might even split the interface to differentiate between functions that make this trade-off and those that do not. A popular example of this is in std::vector, where you need to have enough elements as a precondition to using operator[]. On the other hand, the at() function will still work, but throw an exception.

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Normally, yes. I've seen a few good counterexamples but they are so rare.

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Your last line:

I ask this because I find it almost necessary to have a default construct in a lot of cases. Especially when an object is a member of a class and you want to initialise it IN the constructor of that class.

Implies that you are not using member initializer lists. You do not need a default constructor in this case. Example:

class Member {
public:
  Member(std::string str) { std::cout << str << std::endl; }
};

class Foo {
public:
  Foo() : member_("Foo") {}
private:
  Member member_;
}

Additionally, your question title and body conflict and the terminology is a bit vague. When constructing, it is usually best to leave the object in a valid and usable state. Sometimes the second aspect (being usable) is less necessary, and many solutions require it. Further, in C++11, moving from an object must leave it in a valid state, but doesn't necessarily (and in many cases shouldn't) leave it in a usable state.

EDIT: To address your concern about doing work in your constructor, consider moving the work to either a static member of the Member class, or a private (static or non-static) function in the owning class:

class Member {
public:
  Member(std::string str) { std::cout << str << std::endl; }
};

class Foo {
public:
  Foo() : member_(CreateFoo()) {}
private:
  Member CreateMember() {
    std::string str;
    std::cin >> str;
    return Member(str);
  }
  Member member_;
};

One danger of this approach, however, is that the intialization order can be important if you use a non-static member function to do the creation. A static function is much much safer, but you may wish to pass some other pertinent member info. Remember that initialization is done in order of member declaration within the class, NOT initializer list declaration order.

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First, let us define what exactly a "valid state" is: Its an state where the object could do its work.
For example, if we are writting a class that manages a file and let us to write and read the file, a valid state (following our definition) could be an state where the object is holding a correctly oppened file and its ready to read/write on it.

But consider other situation: Whats the state of a moved rvalue?

File::File( File&& other )
{
    _file_handle = other._file_handle;
    other._file_handle = nullptr; //Whats this state?
} 

Its a state where the file object its not ready to write/read on a file, but is ready to be initialized. That is, is a ready to initialize state.

Now consider an alternative implementation of the above ctor using the copy and swap idiom:

File::File() :
    _file_handle{ nullptr }
{} 

File::File( File&& other ) : File() //Set the object to a ready to initialice state
{
    using std::swap; //Enable ADL

    swap( *this , other );
}

Here we use the default ctor to put the object on a ready to initialice state, and just swap the passed rvalue with this object, resulting on exactly the same behaviour as the first implementation.

As we have seen above, one thing is a ready to work state, a state where the object is ready to do whats supposed to do, and other completely different thing is a ready to initialize state: A state where the object is not ready to work, but is ready to be initialized and setted up to work..

My answer to your question is: An object is not alwways in a valid state (Its not allways ready to be used), but if its not ready to be used it should be ready to be initialized and then ready to work.

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I think there's a difference between being in a "ready to initialise state" while the object cannot be accessed by external code, and being in that state when it can be accessed by external code. Correct me if I'm wrong, but in your first example, I don't think the object could ever be used while _file_handle = nullptr. –  Ben Mar 14 at 16:28
    
@Ben thats the point. Are two different states. One thing is to be ready to work/be usaed, and other is to be ready to be initialized. The first is whats called "valid state" on the question. The second is a state common in certain situations (Like in my examples). –  Manu343726 Mar 14 at 17:04
    
This is not only relevant because of move semantics: The std::fstreams work this way (probably also to provide a way not to need to deal with exceptions). It is easy to use these kind of classes as members in classes which enforce the constructors to produce a "usable" state and in classes which don't. But if std::ifstream would require strict RAII, that is, always acquire a file resource in its ctor, it would be very hard to use it as a member in a class where the default ctor doesn't acquire a file. –  dyp Mar 14 at 21:10
    
@dyp of course, as you pointed out file streams are constructed on that ready-to-initialize state by default, to let the user to open the file explicitly later. Move semantincs are just the most simple example I have found to describe the two kind of states. –  Manu343726 Mar 14 at 23:01

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