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I need to process some arrays that contains undefined values, like the following:

[ 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, , 1, 1 ]
[ 1, , 1, , , 1, 1 ]
[ 1, , , , , 1, 1 ]

What I need to achieve is not a removal of the undefined values, but I need to replace them with zeros.

I tried to use underscore.js to achieve this; without success.

The following is my solution attempt:

binarymap = _.map(binarymap, function(curr){
    // let's replace all undefined with 0s
    if(_.isUndefined(curr)) {
        return 0;
    }
    return curr;
});

Unfortunately, it does not work. underscore.js's function _.map totally ignores undefined values.

Any ideas? Elegant solutions?

share|improve this question
    
I think you can't use the map function, i tried in chrome [ 1, , , , , 1, 1 ].map(function(){console.log(arguments);}); and i only have 3x output not 8 or so –  EricG Mar 14 '14 at 17:18
    
@EricG exactly, this is why I wonder if there is a good alternative –  fstab Mar 14 '14 at 17:21
    
I suspect that underscore uses all the up-to-date array methods where available, and i'm pretty sure that map, filter etc all ignore undefined values. –  Andy Mar 14 '14 at 17:22
1  
If you look at the standard sections 15.4.4.19 and 8.12.6, Array#map is actually expected to work that way, ignoring undefined values present in the array. –  DCoder Mar 14 '14 at 17:24
1  
So dirty, but I had to share: var arr = [ 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, , 1, 1 ]; arr = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(arr).replace(/null/g,0)); –  epascarello Mar 14 '14 at 17:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you wanted to you could add the function as a mixin for use in an underscore chain. Improvised from here.

_.mixin({
  dothis: function(obj, interceptor, context) {
    return interceptor.call(context, obj);
  }
});

function resetArray(arr) {
  for (var i = 0, l = arr.length; i < l; i++) {
    if (arr[i] === undefined) arr[i] = 0;
  }
  return arr;
}

var arr = [ 1, , , , , 1, 1 ];

_(arr)
  .chain()
  .dothis(resetArray)
  .tap(console.log) // [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1]

Fiddle

Edit: actually, there's a simpler way of doing that:

_.mixin({
  resetArray: function (arr) {
    for (var i = 0, l = arr.length; i < l; i++) {
        if (arr[i] === undefined) arr[i] = 0;
    }
    return arr;
  }
});

var arr = [1, , , , , 1, 1];

_(arr)
  .chain()
  .resetArray()
  .tap(console.log)

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
@francesco, I've just added an update for a simpler solution. –  Andy Mar 14 '14 at 17:51

The actual problem here is the missing array elements,

Array elements may be elided at the beginning, middle or end of the element list. Whenever a comma in the element list is not preceded by an AssignmentExpression (i.e., a comma at the beginning or after another comma), the missing array element contributes to the length of the Array and increases the index of subsequent elements. Elided array elements are not defined. If an element is elided at the end of an array, that element does not contribute to the length of the Array.

And Array.prototype.map skips all the missing array elements,

callbackfn is called only for elements of the array which actually exist; it is not called for missing elements of the array.

So, in order to make the Array elements to be considered by the map function, the simplest way I could think of is to tweak your approach a little bit, like this

var arr = [ 1, , , , , 1, 1 ];
console.log(_.map(Array.apply(null, arr), function (currentItem) {
    return _.isUndefined(currentItem) ? 0 : currentItem;
}));
# [ 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1 ]

Here, Array.apply (which is actually Function.prototype.apply) does the important thing, converting the missing elements to undefined.

console.log(Array.apply(null, arr));
# [ 1, undefined, undefined, undefined, undefined, 1, 1 ]
share|improve this answer

Is this what you mean..?

var arr = [ 1, , , , , 1, 1 ];
for( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
 if( typeof(arr[i])==="undefined" ) {
  arr[i] = 9;
 }
}
console.log( arr );

// yields [1, 9, 9, 9, 9, 1, 1] 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is what I mean. But I would like to know if I can achieve an elegant solution by using underscore.js's functions or similar. –  fstab Mar 14 '14 at 17:24
    
This if( arr[i] === undefined ) {... looks better I think. –  c-smile Mar 14 '14 at 17:24
    
@c-smile this is some safety thing that prevents errors when someone writes var undefined = 12. –  EricG Mar 14 '14 at 17:28
    
@francescostablum I cannot give you a more elegant solution I'm not that familiar with underscore js. I can only give you a solution. –  EricG Mar 14 '14 at 17:31
1  
@EricG In such paranoid cases you can use var nothing = {}.nothing; and compare it with that value. It will be more effective than string comparison. –  c-smile Mar 14 '14 at 17:34

If all you need is to remove empty elements from the array, you don't need to use underscore, just iterate over the array removing empty elements with splice.

You could add that feature prototyping Array class in javascript:

var array = [ 1, 1, , , , , 1, 1 ]; 

    Array.prototype.replaceEmptyElements = function(value) {
      for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (typeof this[i] == "undefined") {         
          this[i] = value;
        }
      }
      return this;
    };

var val = //your value
array.replaceEmptyElements(val);
share|improve this answer
    
I believe that this array = array.filter(function() { return true; }) will be more effective for that puprpose. –  c-smile Mar 14 '14 at 17:28
    
@c-smile He doesnt wanna filter, he wants another value for the undefined values (i.e. the length should remain the same) –  EricG Mar 14 '14 at 17:30
    
changed it guys –  Amin Abu-Taleb Mar 14 '14 at 17:33

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