Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to come up with an algorithm for a tree traversal, but I am getting stuck.

This is a fairly hard question (compared to others I have asked) so I may need to keep figuring on my own. But I thought I would throw it out here.

I have the following class structure:

public class Transition
{
    // The state we are moving from.
    public String From { get; set; }
    // All the To states for this from
    public List<String>To { get; set; }
}

List<Transition> currentTransistions;

When currentTransistions is fully filled out it looks like this (for me):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ArrayOfTransition xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Transition>
    <From />
    <To>
      <string>Not Done</string>
    </To>
  </Transition>
  <Transition>
    <From>Not Done</From>
    <To>
      <string>In Progress</string>
      <string>Deleted</string>
    </To>
  </Transition>
  <Transition>
    <From>Deleted</From>
    <To>
      <string>Not Done</string>
    </To>
  </Transition>
  <Transition>
    <From>In Progress</From>
    <To>
      <string>Done</string>
      <string>Ready For Test</string>
      <string>Deleted</string>
    </To>
  </Transition>
  <Transition>
    <From>Done</From>
    <To>
      <string>In Progress</string>
    </To>
  </Transition>
  <Transition>
    <From>Ready For Test</From>
    <To>
      <string>In Progress</string>
      <string>Done</string>
      <string>Deleted</string>
    </To>
  </Transition>
</ArrayOfTransition>

The idea here is that I have mapped the state transitions for TFS Work items. What I need now is a way to say "Given a current state, how do I get to another state".

Ideally it would look like this:

 foreach (string state in GetToFinalState(finalState, currentState, currentTransistions)
 {
     // Save the workitem at the state so we can get to the final state.
 }

GetToFinalState, would have to have a way to caclulate the shortest path and use the yield feature of C# to offer them up one at a time for the foreach statement.

I have used yield one before, so I think I can figure that out. But I am not sure how to do that at the same time as finding the shortest path (with out recalculating on each time in the func)?

If you have read this far, thanks. If you offer an answer then double thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
@Vaccano: For the record, your sample graph is not a tree. It has cycles (Not Done -> Deleted -> Not Done) for instance. A tree, by definition, cannot have cycles. Specifically, it's a directed unweighted graph. Directed, since existence of a transition from A to B doesn't imply there's a transition from B to A. Unweighted, since there's no value/cost/weight assigned to a transition and all transitions are treated equally. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't do that efficiently without calculating the shortest path and yielding each path segment after the whole process is completed. The nature of shortest path problem doesn't lend itself to algorithms that efficiently compute such partial solutions.

Since the transition graph is not weighted, you can simply run a BFS on it to compute the shortest path. You need to do something like this (I'm not sure of the properties of the TFS object so this is just a pseudocode):

IEnumerable<string> ShortestPath(string fromState, string toState, Transition[] currentTransitions) {
    var map = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    var edges = currentTransitions.ToDictionary(i => i.From, i => i.To);
    var q = new Queue<string>(); 
    map.Add(fromState, null);
    q.Enqueue(fromState);
    while (q.Count > 0) {
        var current = q.Dequeue();
        foreach (var s in edges[current]) {
            if (!map.ContainsKey(s)) {
                map.Add(s, current);
                if (s == toState) {
                    var result = new Stack<string>();
                    var thisNode = s;
                    do {
                        result.Push(thisNode);
                        thisNode = map[thisNode];
                    } while (thisNode != fromState);
                    while (result.Count > 0)
                        yield return result.Pop();
                    yield break;
                }
                q.Enqueue(s);
            }
        }
    }
    // no path exists
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to figure out the code (thanks for posting it). I am confused by the visited object. What is that? –  Vaccano Feb 11 '10 at 0:15
1  
@Vaccano: I renamed other instances of it to map. Forgot to rename that one. Will edit. That's what you get when you write the code in Stack Overflow text box rather than in VS or something where it can be tested. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 0:16
    
That worked perfectly!!!!!! You rock! Thank you so very much for this answer! –  Vaccano Feb 11 '10 at 0:34
2  
@Vaccano: Fixed. Let me know if it works. I updated this to optimize the algorithm so that you won't bother looking into the graph after you found the final state. "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 0:54
2  
@Vaccano: Thanks! It's a classic BFS implementation, nothing creative! It's generally not a good idea to do that though. You should vote on posts based on their quality, not their author--and the vote fraud detection mechanisms in Stack Overflow may take it as a vote fraud and cancel your votes. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 1:31

If you need to find the shortest path from a node to a descendent node in an acyclic tree, then Mehrdad's solution is a good one. That is, first do a breadth-first-search until you find the destination node, and then work out the path from the start node to the destination.

If your graph is not an (acyclic) tree, but rather an arbitrary weighted graph, then naive breadth-first-search does not work. Either it goes into infinite loops (if you're not clever about keeping track of when you've seen a node already), or it is not guaranteed to find the least-weight path.

If you're in that situation then a good algorithm to use is the famous "A*" algorithm. I've got some notes on how to implement A* in C# here:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/tags/AStar/default.aspx

This is particularly useful if you have an "estimating function" that can make guesses about what the most likely next node on the shortest path is.

share|improve this answer
    
"If your graph is not an acyclic tree, but rather an arbitrary graph, then naive breadth-first-search does not work. Either it goes into infinite loops, or it is not guaranteed to find the shortest path." I'm pretty sure BFS works on arbitrary graphs (regardless of cycles) as long as they are unweighted. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 0:34
    
WOW! I have no idea wat an acyclic tree is. I tried a few examples with Mehrdad's solution and it was correct each time. So I am going to go with that. (It is clear that there is a lot more to know about trees than what I know.) Thank you for the answer. –  Vaccano Feb 11 '10 at 0:37
    
@Mehrdad: What I'm concerned about is a BFS that does not keep track of "I've been here before" and therefore can run into a cycle right off the bat and keep on going. It's easy to accidentally use a BFS that was written assuming a tree topology with a graph and run off into infinity. But now that I think about it, you're right, assuming you solve the cycle problem, breadth first search does get you the shortest path in an unweighted graph. I'll update the text. –  Eric Lippert Feb 11 '10 at 0:46
1  
@Vaccano: a graph is a set of nodes with (possibly one-way, or "directed") edges between them. A graph can contain cycles in its edges. A tree is a special kind of graph. In particular, trees are directed (parents point to children) and there are never cycles. –  Eric Lippert Feb 11 '10 at 0:49
2  
@Eric: A tree is not required to be directed. It's specifically defined as a connected acyclic graph. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 11 '10 at 0:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.