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Here's my situation. I have two different Web Applications (App1, App2), both with an implementation of WIF and AD FS. They both have Web API controllers, and all calls are secured with WIF. This means that whenever I do an unauthenticated call to my Web API functions, it's redirected to the ADFS login page. They both use the same instance of AD FS, so single-sign-on works.

However, this redirect behavior is problematic in a particular scenario. Let's say that I login through App 1. From App 1, I want to call a WebAPI function on App 2, using an HttpClient or a similar class. My call fails, because it's always redirected to the ADFS

I'm guessing it's because I need to pass my security token somehow, but I haven't figured out how. Any help about how I could do this would be greatly appreciated.

TL;DR: Can I call a Web API function secured by WIF/ADFS through a client in .NET code?

Thanks!

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The Role-Based Security and Access Controll free ebok contains detailed information on this and other wcf related scenarios. –  Wiktor Zychla Mar 14 '14 at 21:14
    
Can't find it... who's the author? –  Sdupere Mar 14 '14 at 21:36
    

1 Answer 1

IMHO opinion web api is not compatible with a passive WIF redirect. This does not mean you can't protect your web api; it just means that a passive scenario is not ok for this. Web api, by its very nature calls more for an active scenario where you get your security token from your STS through code, not through the redirects of a browser (in web api there normally isn't any browser). Then your need to pass your security token along with the web api call (normally through some http header like x-authorization) There is not standard for this but some good ways are documented in a book like web api security. This means your have to write some actionfilters yourself to get the security token out of the header. I addition, I think the ThinkTecture libraries offer some off the shelf support for securing web api's.

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