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Consider the following code:

x = 4
y = 5
z = (y + x)

puts z

As you'd expect, the output is 9. If you introduce a newline:

x = 4
y = 5
z = y
+ x

puts z

Then it outputs 5. This makes sense, because it's interpreted as two separate statements (z = y and +x).

However, I don't understand how it works when you have a newline within parentheses:

x = 4
y = 5
z = (y
+ x)

puts z

The output is 4. Why?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

(Disclaimer: I'm not a Ruby programmer at all. This is just a wild guess.)

With parens, you get z being assigned the value of

y
+x

Which evaluates to the value of the last statement executed.

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+1. I was trying to explain the basic concept of unfinished commands when I realized that the output was 4, not 9. Good going :) –  Matchu Feb 11 '10 at 1:29
    
That makes lots of sense. I was coming from the same example in Scala where it treats it as z = (y+x) and outputs 9. Good explanation :-) –  mopoke Feb 11 '10 at 1:36
1  
Multiline parentheses are essentially a block, and the block's value is the last statement in it. –  kejadlen Feb 11 '10 at 6:25

End the line with \ in order to continue the expression on the next line. This gives the proper output:

x = 4
y = 5
z = (y \
  + x)
puts z

outputs 9

I don't know why the result is unexpected without escaping the newline. I just learned never to do that.

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Well you won't need the escaping character \ if your lines finishes with the operator

a = 4
b = 5
z = a +
    b

puts z 
# => 9
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I use this technique to end a line with a dot if I'm chaining together a bunch of methods. –  glenn jackman Feb 11 '10 at 11:28
    
Yes, is the best way to break long lines of code –  Roman Gonzalez Feb 11 '10 at 18:29

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