Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to truncate absolute values below an epsilon to 0, e.g.,

Truncate[{-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}, 1.5] -> {-3, -2, 0, 0, 0, 2, 3}

I guess I could write a function using Scan[] and If[], but is there a more idiomatic "one-liner" way of doing it in Mathematica?

share|improve this question
1  
I wish I could mark both @dreeves and @Ramashalanka's answers as "accepted." @dreeves fits my exact problem better, but @Ramashalanka's gives the general pattern. – Larry OBrien Feb 11 '10 at 18:09
    
I gave you a fish, Ramashalanka showed you how to fish. :) (In the meantime I edited my answer to be a bit more general. Maybe now it's worthy of the Accepted Answer status you graciously bestowed!) – dreeves Feb 12 '10 at 16:11
    
Larry, did you see my reply? I realize this is more than a year later, but if you are still doing similar operations, it could save a lot of computation time. – Mr.Wizard Apr 16 '11 at 14:48
    
@Mr Wizard -- very nice. A little hard to parse at first glance, but performance-wise, it's excellent. – Larry OBrien May 4 '11 at 23:13
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The built in function Chop is almost exactly what you're looking for (it does work on lists, as in your example). One potential surprise is that it doesn't chop (truncate) integers, only floating point numbers. So for your example to work as you might expect, first convert your list to floating point with the N function:

Chop[N@{-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}, 1.5] -> {-3., -2., 0, 0, 0, 2., 3.}

As Ramashalanka shows, to do this sort of thing more generally, I recommend:

If[Abs[#]<1.5&, 0, #]& /@ {-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}

Ie, a lambda function mapped over the list.

share|improve this answer

Lots of options that all work:

Map[If[Abs[#] < 1.5, 0, #] &, {-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}]

or the equivalent:

If[Abs[#] < 1.5, 0, #] & /@ {-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}

or, if you prefer:

ReplaceAll[{-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}, (x_ /; Abs[x] < 1.5) -> 0]

which is equivalent to:

{-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3} /. (x_ /; Abs[x] < 1.5) -> 0

or

ReplaceAll[{-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3}, (x_?(Abs[#] < 1.5 &)) -> 0]

which is equivalent to:

{-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3} /. (x_?(Abs[#] < 1.5 &)) -> 0
share|improve this answer

Here is a method (f3) that is nearly an order of magnitude faster.

It is adapted from code by Fred Simons.


f1 = If[Abs[#] < 1.5, 0, #] & /@ # &;

f2 = # /. (x_ /; Abs[x] < 1.5) -> 0 &;

f3 = # (1 - Unitize@Clip[#, {-1.5, 1.5}, {0, 0}]) &;

lst = RandomInteger[{-100, 100}, 5000];

SameQ @@ (#@lst & /@ {f1, f2, f3})

First@Timing@Do[#@lst, {500}] & /@ {f1, f2, f3}

(* Out=  True                  *)

(* Out=  {0.406, 2.282, 0.047} *)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.