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int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
       char buf[sizeof(argv)];
       fgets(buf, sizeof(argv), stdin));
}

After compiling the program, I want the user to put the output file's name and an input, where I want to only save the value in the buffer. The above one, waits for the user to input the output file and press enter, then waits to get the value. But I want to do that, both in the same line.

For eg:

 $testfunction 30
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2  
As it stands that sizeof doesn't do what you want. It is also unclear what you are asking ? I don't understand how a user is supposed to call and use your program. Are you looking to take command line arguments ? Are you looking for an "interactive" mode ? –  cnicutar Mar 14 at 23:21
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. Are you looking to read values from command line arguments, or from standard input? It isn't clear. Your use of sizeof(argv) is wrong; the size of a pointer is (normally) 4 or 8 bytes. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 14 at 23:22
    
are you asking how to use arguments ? your question does not make sense with your words –  Thomas Ruiz Mar 14 at 23:22
    
After compiling my program. I want the user to pass 2 arguments in the shell in order for the program to run. The first argument is the program name and the second argument is a value. I want to save the value in the buffer. –  user3399600 Mar 14 at 23:28
1  
You don't usually need to copy arguments. There's no point unless you're going to modify what was passed (increase it) or you want to have both the original and a (modifiable) copy of the argument. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 14 at 23:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Attempt the Second

I want the user to pass 2 arguments in the shell in order for the program to run. The first argument is the program name and the second argument is a value. I want to save the value in the buffer.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc != 2)
    {
       fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s argument\n", argv[0]);
       return 1;
    }
    char buffer[strlen(argv[1]) + 1];
    strcpy(buffer, argv[1]);
    printf("Argument: <<%s>>\nBuffer:   <<%s>>\n", argv[1], buffer);
    return 0;
}

Attempt the First

If you want a program to read an output file name and a value from the command line, you might write:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc != 3)
    {
       fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s file number\n", argv[0]);
       return 1;
    }
    FILE *fp = fopen(argv[1], "w");
    if (fp == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open file %s for writing\n", argv[1]);
        return 1;
    }
    fprintf(fp, "%s\n", argv[2]);
    fclose(fp);
    printf("Wrote <<%s>> to %s\n", argv[2], argv[1]);
    return 0;
}

You could error check both fprintf() and fclose(), but many people don't bother. It is crucial that you check file open operations, and input operations, though. Always, but always check those.

If your source file is rdwr.c, then you might type:

$ gcc -g -O3 -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Werror rdwr.c -o rdwr
$ ./rdwr output.file 20314
Wrote <<20314>> to output.file
$ cat output.file
20134
$
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Thanks man exactly what I wanted to do. –  user3399600 Mar 15 at 7:46

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