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I have an abstract class Node which contains a pure virtual method stub matches, requiring another instance of a Node (i.e. instance of something that subclasses Node) as a parameter.

class Node; // forward declaration

class Node {
public:
    Node() : parentNode(this) {}
    virtual ~Node() {}

    Node* parentNode;

    virtual bool matches(const Node& node) const = 0;
};

How can I implement matches in a subclass such that the parameter can be of the subclasses type as opposed to Node?

E.g. I want something like the following to register as the implemented version of the contract from Node, so that I can access NodeImpl specific properties as part of the function which I would otherwise be unable to do:

class NodeImpl : public Node {
private:
    int foo;
    ...
};

...

bool NodeImpl::matches(const NodeImpl& n) const {
    return this->foo == n.foo;
}

(I did have a try using templates to achieve this sort of effect, but I wasn't sure that I was doing it quite right. I found myself propagating the templates all over my code and encountering a myriad errors as such, and was hoping to get an idea of what the right method for this exactly is before I waste yet more time on what might well be also the wrong way of doing things.)

What I tried was:

template <class T>
class Node;

template <class T>
class Node {
public:
    Node() : parentNode(this) {}
    virtual ~Node() {}

    Node* parentNode;

    virtual bool matches(const T& node) const = 0;
};

So that I could call matches generically in a template function like so:

template <class T>
void pathComp(Node<T>& currNode, Node<T>& rootNode) {
    Node<T> *node = &currNode;
    while (node->matches(rootNode)) {
        ...
    }
}

I couldn't quite get this method to work, plus I didn't like how I seemingly had to have class NodeImpl : public Node<NodeImpl> as my inheritance, something about that didn't seem quite right. Any advice as to whether I was on the right lines or not would be great!

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For the template, I believe you want bool matches(const Node<T> &node) const and have it not be virtual. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 15 '14 at 5:04
    
The construct NodeImpl : public Node<NodeImpl> is a known pattern, strange as it may look. Check out the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern. –  R Sahu Mar 15 '14 at 5:13

2 Answers 2

You can't really do that in general, because it wouldn't be type-safe. For example:

struct Node { virtual bool matches(const Node &) const = 0; }
struct NodeA : Node { virtual bool matches(const NodeA &) const; };
struct NodeB : Node { virtual bool matches(const NodeB &) const; };

NodeA a; // compiler doesn't allow, but if it did...
NodeB b;
Node &c = a;
c.matches(b); // oops!

The way you are talking about implementing it, there would be an assumption that b was the same type as a, but there is no way for the compiler to verify that assumption in general, so it isn't going to allow it.

However, if you are using two nodes of the same type, you can always have the matches() function just not be virtual:

struct Node {   }
struct NodeA : Node {  bool matches(const NodeA &) const; };

NodeA a1;
NodeA a2;
a1.matches(a2); // fine
share|improve this answer
    
So if I wanted Node to contractually oblige subclasses to implement a matches method, but only between Nodes of the same subclass type, how would I go about doing so? I tried using templates and having bool matches(const T& node) but I got rather lost in doing so. –  Quetzalcoatl Mar 15 '14 at 4:43
    
@Quetzalcoatl: Could you give an example of how this would be used? –  Vaughn Cato Mar 15 '14 at 4:45
    
Sure, give me a minute or two to extend my question. –  Quetzalcoatl Mar 15 '14 at 4:46
1  
@Quetzalcoatl: what you are asking for is basically not possible at compile-time. matches() needs to take a generic Node as input, and then each class will have to use dynamic_cast to check if the input is the correct type before doing something with it, eg: bool A::matches(const Node &node) const { const A *a = dynamic_cast<const A*>(&node); if (a) { ... } else return false; } –  Remy Lebeau Mar 15 '14 at 5:07

You should honor the superclass' contract signature. Then if you need to access sub-class properties, just cast to the sub-class, as needed.

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