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Thanks a million everyone for everyone's response. Unfortunately, none of the solutions appear to be working on my end, and my guess is that the example I've provided is messed up.

So let me try again.

My table looks like this:

	contract	project	activity
row1	1000	8000	10
row2	1000	8000	20
row3	1000	8001	10
row4	2000	9000	49
row5	2000	9001	49
row6	3000	9000	79
row7	3000	9000	78

Basically, the query I'm looking for would return "2000,49" for "contract, activity" because only contract #2000 has one, and ONLY one, unique activity value.

Again, thanks a million in advance, boroatel

share|improve this question
    
What is the PK for this table? –  Walter Mitty Jun 14 '11 at 13:43

12 Answers 12

Updated to use your newly provided data:

The solutions using the original data may be found at the end of this answer.

Using your new data:

DECLARE  @T TABLE( [contract] INT, project INT, activity INT )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000,    8000,    10 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000,    8000,    20 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000,    8001,    10 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 2000,    9000,    49 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 2000,    9001,    49 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 3000,    9000,    79 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 3000,    9000,    78 )

SELECT DISTINCT [contract], activity FROM @T AS A WHERE
	(SELECT COUNT( DISTINCT activity ) 
	 FROM @T AS B WHERE B.[contract] = A.[contract]) = 1

returns: 2000, 49

Solutions using original data

WARNING: The following solutions use the data previously given in the question and may not make sense for the current question. I have left them attached for completeness only.

SELECT Col1, Count( col1 ) AS count FROM table 
GROUP BY col1
HAVING count > 1

This should get you a list of all the values in col1 that are not distinct. You can place this in a table var or temp table and join against it.

Here is an example using a sub-query:

DECLARE @t TABLE( col1 VARCHAR(1), col2 VARCHAR(1), col3 VARCHAR(1) )

INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'A', 'B', 'C' );
INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'D', 'E', 'F' );
INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'A', 'J', 'K' );
INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'G', 'H', 'H' );

SELECT * FROM @t

SELECT col1, col2 FROM @t WHERE col1 NOT IN 
    (SELECT col1 FROM @t AS t GROUP BY col1 HAVING COUNT( col1 ) > 1)

This returns:

D   E
G   H

And another method that users a temp table and join:

DECLARE @t TABLE( col1 VARCHAR(1), col2 VARCHAR(1), col3 VARCHAR(1) )

INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'A', 'B', 'C' );
INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'D', 'E', 'F' );
INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'A', 'J', 'K' );
INSERT INTO @t VALUES( 'G', 'H', 'H' );

SELECT * FROM @t

DROP TABLE #temp_table	
SELECT col1 INTO #temp_table
	FROM @t AS t GROUP BY col1 HAVING COUNT( col1 ) = 1

SELECT t.col1, t.col2 FROM @t AS t
	INNER JOIN #temp_table AS tt ON t.col1 = tt.col1

Also returns:

D   E
G   H
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what the original question looked like when you answered this, but given what is there now, it misses the target and is extremely difficult to map to the target. I suspect that is because you had less information to work with then than we do now. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '08 at 3:15
1  
Yes, the asker changed the question and used a different data set. The answers given above were complete with the dataset given. I have updated the answer to reflect this and added a solution using the new dataset. –  vfilby Oct 22 '08 at 3:39

For MySQL:

SELECT contract, activity
FROM table
GROUP BY contract
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT activity) = 1
share|improve this answer
    
This also doesn't work, you can't have columns on the select list that are not in the the GROUP BY or an aggregate. You'll have to use the same principle but in a sub query or join. –  vfilby Oct 22 '08 at 2:26
    
actually I tested my code in MySQL and it works –  mrm Oct 22 '08 at 3:34
    
*worked (with the first example data) –  mrm Oct 22 '08 at 3:42
    
My bad, this is a limitation of SQL Server. I didn't realize that MySQL could have items on the select list that were not an aggregate function or in the group by. Sorry mate. –  vfilby Oct 22 '08 at 3:45

I'm a fan of NOT EXISTS

SELECT DISTINCT contract, activity FROM table t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  SELECT * FROM table t2
  WHERE t2.contract = t1.contract AND t2.activity != t1.activity
)
share|improve this answer

Try this:

select 
         contract,
        max (activity) 
from
         mytable 
group by
         contract 
having
         count (activity) = 1
share|improve this answer
    
When tested in IBM Informix Dynamic Server 11.50, this produces no data, not the row with 2000,49 as required. The problem is that contract 2000 has two project rows with the same activity code, so count(activity) = 2 and not 1 as required. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '08 at 3:10
    
This doesn't work on SQL Server 2005. The problem here is that there are two rows for 2000,49. You need to count only distinct activities. –  vfilby Oct 22 '08 at 11:42
    
In the light of these comments, see Jetson's response. –  Walter Mitty Jun 14 '11 at 13:47

Modified!

SELECT distinct contract, activity from @t a
WHERE (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT activity) FROM @t b WHERE b.contract = a.contract) = 1

And here's another one -- shorter/cleaner without subquery

select contract, max(activity) from @t
group by contract
having count(distinct activity) = 1
share|improve this answer
    
When tested in IBM Informix Dynamic Server 11.50, it produces no data. The problem is that contract 2000 has two project rows with the same activity code, so the COUNT(*) is returning 2, not 1. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '08 at 3:13
    
@Jonathan: the question is about Microsoft SQL Server, so Informix' implementation of SQL is completely irrelevant here. –  Milan Babuškov Oct 22 '08 at 5:54
    
True that IDS is not directly relevant, but it is a valid SQL implementation and the SQL above runs but does not produce the correct answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 22 '08 at 16:29

Utilizing the "dynamic table" capability in SQL Server
(querying against a parenthesis-surrounded query),
you can return 2000, 49 w/ the following.

If your platform doesn't offer an equivalent to the "dynamic table" ANSI-extention,
you can always utilize a temp table in two-steps/statement
by inserting the results within the "dynamic table" to a temp table,
and then performing a subsequent select on the temp table.


DECLARE @T TABLE(
    [contract] INT,
    project INT,
    activity INT
)

INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000, 8000, 10 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000, 8000, 20 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000, 8001, 10 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 2000, 9000, 49 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 2000, 9001, 49 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 3000, 9000, 79 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 3000, 9000, 78 )

SELECT
     [contract]
    ,[Activity] = max (activity)
FROM
    (
        SELECT
            [contract]
            ,[Activity]
        FROM
            @T
        GROUP BY
            [contract]
            ,[Activity]
    ) t
GROUP BY
    [contract]
HAVING count (*) = 1
share|improve this answer

Assuming your table of data is called ProjectInfo:

SELECT DISTINCT Contract, Activity
    FROM ProjectInfo
    WHERE Contract = (SELECT Contract
                          FROM (SELECT DISTINCT Contract, Activity
                                    FROM ProjectInfo) AS ContractActivities
                          GROUP BY Contract
                          HAVING COUNT(*) = 1);

The innermost query identifies the contracts and the activities. The next level of the query (the middle one) identifies the contracts where there is just one activity. The outermost query then pulls the contract and activity from the ProjectInfo table for the contracts that have a single activity.

Tested using IBM Informix Dynamic Server 11.50 - should work elsewhere too.

share|improve this answer

Here is another option using sql servers count distinct:

DECLARE  @T TABLE( [contract] INT, project INT, activity INT )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000,    8000,    10 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000,    8000,    20 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 1000,    8001,    10 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 2000,    9000,    49 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 2000,    9001,    49 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 3000,    9000,    79 )
INSERT INTO @T VALUES( 3000,    9000,    78 )



SELECT DISTINCT [contract], activity FROM @T AS A WHERE
	(SELECT COUNT( DISTINCT activity ) 
	 FROM @T AS B WHERE B.[contract] = A.[contract]) = 1
share|improve this answer
SELECT DISTINCT Contract, Activity
FROM Contract WHERE Contract IN (
SELECT Contract 
FROM Contract
GROUP BY Contract
HAVING COUNT( DISTINCT Activity ) = 1 )
share|improve this answer
    
Tested using MS SQL 2005 –  Hapkido Oct 22 '08 at 4:00

Sorry you're not using PostgreSQL...

SELECT DISTINCT ON contract, activity * FROM thetable ORDER BY contract, activity

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.3/static/sql-select.html#SQL-DISTINCT

Oh wait. You only want values with exactly one...

SELECT contract, activity, count() FROM thetable GROUP BY contract, activity HAVING count() = 1

share|improve this answer

Sorry old post I know but I had the same issue, couldn't get any of the above to work for me, however I figured it out.

This worked for me:

SELECT DISTINCT [column]As UniqueValues FROM [db].[dbo].[table]

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SELECT DISTINCT Col1,Col2 FROM Table GROUP BY Col1 HAVING COUNT( DISTINCT Col1 ) = 1

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