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I'm using Play framework 2.2 for one of my upcoming web application. I have implemented my controllers in synchronous pattern, with several blocking calls (mainly, database).

For example,

Synchronous version:

public static Result index(){
  User user = db.getUser(email); // blocking
  User anotherUser = db.getUser(emailTwo); // blocking
  ...
  user.sendEmail(); // call to a webservice, blocking.
  return ok();
}

So, while optimising the code, decided to make use of Asynchronous programming support of Play. Gone through the documentation, but the idea is still vague to me, as I'm confused about how to properly convert the above synchronous block of code to Async.

So, I came up with below code:

Asynchronous version:

public static Promise<Result> index(){
  return Promise.promise(
    new Function0<Result>(){
      public Result apply(){
        User user = db.getUser(email); // blocking
        User anotherUser = db.getUser(emailTwo); // blocking
        ...
        user.sendEmail(); // call to a webservice, blocking.
        return ok();
      }
    }
  );
}

So, I just wrapped the entire control logic inside a promise block.

  1. Is my approach correct?
  2. Should I convert each and every blocking request inside the controller, as Asynchronous, or wrapping several blocking calls inside single Async block is enough?
share|improve this question
    
why did the title get edited??? I think the original title 'How to properly implement Async programming in Play framework?' was better since it isn't just about changing the controller but about implementing a complete non-blocking application flow. Just re-writing a synchronous controller will not make it asynchronous! –  stikkos Mar 16 '14 at 18:13
    
Is there any way that user.sendEmail() could be made non-blocking? –  James Ward Mar 16 '14 at 18:56
    
depends on what you use to send email, if you use for example Amazon Simple Email Service, you could use the AWS Java SDK which supports asynchronous emails. Or you can use the JavaMail API as described on docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/tutorial/doc/gkiez.html Do you think the client should be blocked until the email is send? –  stikkos Mar 16 '14 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

The play framework is asynchronous by nature and it allows the creation of fully non-blocking code. But in order to be non-blocking - with all its benefits - you can't just wrap your blocking code and expect magic to happen...

In an ideal scenario, your complete application is written in a non-blocking manner. If this is not possible (for whatever reason), you might want to abstract your blocking code in Akka actors or behind async interfaces which return scala.concurrent.Future's. This way you can execute your blocking code (simultaneously) in a dedicated Execution Context, without impacting other actions. After all, having all your actions share the same ExecutionContext means they share the same Thread pool. So an Action that blocks Threads might drastically impact other Actions doing pure CPU while having CPU not fully utilized!

In your case, you probably want to start at the lowest level. It looks like the database calls are blocking so start by refactoring these first. You either need to find an asynchronous driver for whatever database you are using or if there is only a blocking driver available, you should wrap them in a future to execute using a DB-specific execution context (with a ThreadPool that's the same size as the DB ConnectionPool).

Another advantage of abstracting the DB calls behind an async interface is that, if at some point in the future, you switch to a non-blocking driver, you can just change the implementation of your interface without having to change your controllers!

In your re-active controller, you can then handle these futures and work with them (when they complete). You can find more about working with Futures here

Here's a simplified example of your controller method doing non-blocking calls, and then combining the results in your view, while sending an email asynchronous:

public static Promise<Result> index(){
    scala.concurrent.Future<User> user = db.getUser(email); // non-blocking
    scala.concurrent.Future<User> anotherUser = db.getUser(emailTwo); // non-blocking

    List<scala.concurrent.Future<User>> listOfUserFutures = new ArrayList<>();
    listOfUserFutures.add(user);
    listOfUserFutures.add(anotherUser);
    final ExecutionContext dbExecutionContext = Akka.system().dispatchers().lookup("dbExecutionContext");
    scala.concurrent.Future<Iterable<User>> futureListOfUsers = akka.dispatch.Futures.sequence(listOfUserFutures, dbExecutionContext);  

    final ExecutionContext mailExecutionContext = Akka.system().dispatchers().lookup("mailExecutionContext");
    user.andThen(new OnComplete<User>() {
        public void onComplete(Throwable failure, User user) {
             user.sendEmail(); // call to a webservice, non-blocking.       
        }
    }, mailExecutionContext);

    return Promise.wrap(futureListOfUsers.flatMap(new Mapper<Iterable<User>, Future<Result>>() {
        public Future<Result> apply(final Iterable<User> users) {
            return Futures.future(new Callable<Result>() {
                public Result call() {              
                    return ok(...);
                }
            }, Akka.system().dispatcher());
        }
    }, ec));
}
share|improve this answer
2  
The web service calls using the play WS library are non-blocking. For DB calls, as is mentioned in the earlier post, you would have to see if your database server has a non-blocking driver. In my knowledge, only MongoDB has a non-blocking driver link –  Joji Mar 16 '14 at 1:03
    
I'm using MySQL with Play's EBean. So, I suppose it doesn't yet support Future? –  Veera Mar 16 '14 at 2:05
1  
I think EBean do support asynchronous queries... check avaje.org/ebean/introquery_future.html –  stikkos Mar 16 '14 at 11:44

It you don't have anything to not block on then there may not be a reason to make your controller async. Here is a good blog about this from one of the creators of Play: http://sadache.tumblr.com/post/42351000773/async-reactive-nonblocking-threads-futures-executioncont

share|improve this answer
1  
Hey James, why do you say there is no reason to be async? The OP is asking for optimisations, don't you agree that being fully non-blocking and writing re-active code is an optimisation over being blocking? I agree that just wrapping your blocking code is pointless but i don't understand why you recommend him to just keep what he has... –  stikkos Mar 16 '14 at 11:52
2  
If the code can be non-blocking then it has to be async. But if it can't be non-blocking then there is no reason to be async. Play already handles all requests asynchronously under the covers. –  James Ward Mar 16 '14 at 18:55
1  
JDBC is blocking and trying to wrap it in async doesn't afford any performance advantages. There are definitely other reasons to put db stuff in actors but not for the sake of being async. –  James Ward Mar 16 '14 at 20:16
1  
I agree. But when the question specifically says the db calls are blocking and asks how to make the controller async, the right answer is "don't". If the question was "how can I make this whole thing non-blocking?" then the answer is very different. –  James Ward Mar 16 '14 at 23:23
1  
@JamesWard By using a classical Action for controller (not async), he would have to wait for the result (Await.result) before returning a Result like Ok(myResult); therefore blocking the Play's default thread pool. Unless he increases the default thread pool, the blocking caused by Await.result would slow down the handling of new requests. In the contrary, making controller async would allow to pass (and forget for some time) a Future handled with a dedicated ExecutionContext (DBExecutionContext), releasing the default thread for new request handling. What do you think about? –  Mik378 Jul 6 '14 at 10:00

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