Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let say I have the following code

$("p").bind("click", function(){
  alert( $(this).text() );
});

When the user clicks a <p>, an alert show up. What's good here, is that I make use of the "this" keyword.

Now I want to get rid of the anonymous function (using it multiple time per script);

$("p").bind("click", myfunction());
myfunction(){
  alert( $(this).text() );
}

this now refer to Window. How can i do to fix that?

Update:

A suggested solution by answerers that actually works

$(function(){
    $("p").bind("click", function() { myfunction($(this));});

    function myfunction(elem)
    {
      alert( elem.text() );
    }
});

This is good, but you'll finish creating a new function every time that line of code is called, no?

share|improve this question
1  
You're invoking the function myfunction at the time of the bind call. You want to pass a ref to the function to bind. –  Larry K Feb 11 '10 at 4:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want to pass the original "this" (the context) to the function.

In Javascript, that's done by using call. Eg, see here

So I modify Jonathon's answer:

$("p").bind("click", function(){ myFunction.call(this); });

function myfunction(){
  alert($(this).text());
}

Added:

I looked up jquery bind and Jonathon is right, the context is automatically set to be the original element that you're adding the event listener to.

I think the real issue is that you're not passing in the function ref correctly.

Try

$("p").bind("click", myfunction);
var myfunction = function(){
  alert( $(this).text() );
}
share|improve this answer
    
rahul posted it before I did. jQuery already sets this to be the p that you clicked on, so the additional call is unnecessary. rahul's answer is fine; in fact if I'm making a generic myFunction, I'd rather pass an element to act upon to the function than require my caller to use call or apply. –  Jonathon Faust Feb 11 '10 at 4:41
    
Good catch on the function reference, forgot to mention that. –  Jonathon Faust Feb 11 '10 at 4:56
    
you are passing the function without arguments? What about if you have arguments? –  Omar Abid Feb 11 '10 at 5:00
    
@Omar You're passing a reference to the function. The way you showed in your question, you evaluate the function and pass the return value to the bind, which doesn't make much sense. If you have arguments, you can wrap it in a function call like rahul's solution does. –  Jonathon Faust Feb 11 '10 at 5:03
    
@Omar, You mean you want your event-handling function to have access to additional information/arguments? See api.jquery.com/bind -- see the "Passing Event Data" section of the page. If you mean how do I use the call statement and send arguments in addition to context, the answer is place them as additional args to the call. Eg myfunction.call(thisObj, arg1, arg2, etc) –  Larry K Feb 11 '10 at 5:07

Something like

$(function(){
    $("p").bind("click", function() { myfunction($(this));});

    function myfunction(elem)
    {
      alert( elem.text() );
    }
});

Here also you are not removing the anonymous function. But inside that you can call another function.

share|improve this answer
    
The answer is passing this as an argument to the function, not as the context of the function. –  Larry K Feb 11 '10 at 4:30
    
does solve the problem, but you'll finish creating a new anonymous function every time; imagine a table with 400 row, create 400 new function? –  Omar Abid Feb 11 '10 at 4:53
    
@Omar Unless you can point to something telling me wrong, I think it's going to create only one function and point all the p click handlers to the one function. I wouldn't optimize before I know it's a problem... –  Jonathon Faust Feb 11 '10 at 4:58
    
I just gave <p> as an example. I'm using a loop over some table rows and binding that anonymous function each time. So doesn't it create new functions? It should. and this is why I want to make use of non-anonymous functions to avoid creating multiple functions. –  Omar Abid Feb 11 '10 at 5:04
    
@Omar It creates a closure. If you have multiple elements, you should not be looping over them. You need to select all the elements you want using an appropriate jQuery selector and bind once. –  Jonathon Faust Feb 11 '10 at 5:07

I was just thinking, why would you want to do it that way?

$("p").bind("click", function(){
  alert( $(this).text() );
});

when you can add up more selector like this:

$("p,div,li,:button").bind("click", function(){
  alert( $(this).text() );
});
share|improve this answer
    
I wondered the same thing, but you could conceivably have some method you want to call from several places including a click handler. –  Jonathon Faust Feb 11 '10 at 4:48

You can do this to get the real element that invoked the handler..

function myfunc(e)
{
  var _this = e.currentTarget;
  alert( $(_this).text());
}

according to jQuery documentation

event.currentTarget

Description: The current DOM element within the event bubbling phase.

version added: 1.3

This property will always be equal to the this of the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Using the jQuery event argument is on the right track, but currentTarget won't help in this case. currentTarget would be window in the example shown in the question. –  Dave Ward Feb 11 '10 at 5:10
    
Nope.. currentTarget since i extract it from the e parameter, which is the actual event passed from the jQuery binding, will point to the actual element handling the event.. try it at : jsbin.com/awuzo/2 –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Feb 11 '10 at 5:35

The problem there was that your event handler was calling the function, myfunction(), versus passing a reference to it, myfunction. That's what changed the scope it was running in. If you pass the function a parameter, myfunction, "this" should work as expected.

More generally, if all you really care about is knowing which element raised the event, use the normalized event object that jQuery passes into event handlers:

$("p").bind("click", function(evt) {
  // this === evt.target;

  alert($(evt.target).text());
});

Or:

$("p").bind("click", myfunction);

myfunction(evt) {
  alert($(evt.target).text());
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.