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I am working with audio data. I'd like to play the sample file in reverse. The data is stored as unsigned ints and packed nice and tight. Is there a way to call memcpy that will copy in reverse order. i.e. if I had 1,2,3,4 stored in an array, could I call memcpy and magically reverse them so I get 4,3,2,1.

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C doesn't have a function like that, but it's very easy to write one. –  Alok Singhal Feb 11 '10 at 5:38
    
It might be worth considering changing how you iterate over the data rather than changing the order, I suspect it'd be more efficient... –  Mark Elliot Feb 11 '10 at 5:55
2  
You've got me stumped with magically. –  Craig McQueen Feb 11 '10 at 6:06
1  
Mark, i dont iterate, i copy buffers in chunks. Craig - computers are magic right? :) –  Aran Mulholland Feb 11 '10 at 6:28
1  
Computers might be way cool, which is a rough approximation of magic for some purposes I guess. :-) –  Craig McQueen Feb 11 '10 at 6:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This works for copying ints in reverse:

void reverse_intcpy(int *restrict dst, const int *restrict src, size_t n)
{
    size_t i;

    for (i=0; i < n; ++i)
        dst[n-1-i] = src[i];

}

Just like memcpy(), the regions pointed-to by dst and src must not overlap.

If you want to reverse in-place:

void reverse_ints(int *data, size_t n)
{
    size_t i;

    for (i=0; i < n/2; ++i) {
        int tmp = data[i];
        data[i] = data[n - 1 - i];
        data[n - 1 - i] = tmp;
    }
}

Both the functions above are portable. You might be able to make them faster by using hardware-specific code.

(I haven't tested the code for correctness.)

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1  
whats the effeciency of this in comparison with memcpy? –  Aran Mulholland Feb 11 '10 at 5:44
1  
memcpy should be O(n) and so should this reverse_memcpy function. –  dreamlax Feb 11 '10 at 5:50
2  
With my quick testing, with -O3 optimization, reverse_memcpy() is about 3 times slower than memcpy() for copying 1000000 bytes. For 10000 iterations with 1000000 bytes, memcpy() took 4 seconds, and reverse_memcpy() took 11. But these numbers are for a very specific case, so you may want to test things for yourself. Of course, as dreamlax said, both are O(n). –  Alok Singhal Feb 11 '10 at 5:56
1  
@mP only if dst==src. –  Craig McQueen Feb 11 '10 at 6:08
1  
@mP: I realized that the OP might want to reverse in-place. I was editing my post when you made the comment. Agree with the your point completely. The "first edition" of my answer had a warning about the need for non-overlapping regions and the use of restrict keyword in C99... –  Alok Singhal Feb 11 '10 at 6:10

No, memcpy won't do that backwards. If you're working in C, write a function to do it. If you're really working in C++ use std::reverse or std::reverse_copy.

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I know this is old, but could you post an example of a function that does this? It's simple, but it might help someone. –  Austin Mullins Jul 17 '14 at 14:41

The pure implementations in C will be slow, here are the assembly implementations for byte array and array of 32-bit values (e.g. will work for int and float):

void *memcpy_reverse_ints_floats(void *dest, const void *src, int count)
{
    _asm
    {
        push esi
        push edi
        push eax
        push ebx
        push ecx

        mov esi, dword ptr [src]
        mov edi, dword ptr [dest]

        mov ebx, count
        mov ecx, ebx
        shl ebx, 2
        sub ebx, 4
        add esi, ebx

        cmp ecx, 0
        jz end

    copy:
        mov eax, [esi]
        mov [edi], eax
        add edi, 4
        sub esi, 4

        dec ecx
        jnz copy

    end:
        pop ecx
        pop ebx
        pop eax
        pop edi
        pop esi
    }
}

void *memcpy_reverse_bytes(char *dest, const char *src, int count)
{
    _asm
    {
        push esi
        push edi
        push eax
        push ebx
        push ecx

        mov esi, dword ptr [src]
        mov edi, dword ptr [dest]

        mov ebx, count
        mov ecx, ebx
        add esi, ecx
        sub esi, 4

        shr ecx, 2

        cmp ecx, 0
        jz copy_next

    copy:
        mov eax, [esi]
        bswap eax
        mov [edi], eax
        add edi, 4
        sub esi, 4

        dec ecx
        jnz copy

    copy_next:
        mov ecx, ebx
        shr ecx, 2
        shl ecx, 2
        sub ebx, ecx
        mov ecx, ebx

        cmp ecx, 0
        jz end

        add esi, 3

    copy2:
        mov al, [esi]
        mov [edi], al
        inc edi
        dec esi

        dec ecx
        jnz copy2

    end:
        pop ecx
        pop ebx
        pop eax
        pop edi
        pop esi
    }
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int x[10] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
    int y[10];

    char a[9] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};
    char b[9];

    float c[10] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
    float d[10];

    memcpy_reverse_ints_floats(y, x, sizeof(x) / sizeof(x[0]) );
    memcpy_reverse_bytes(b, a, sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]) );
    memcpy_reverse_ints_floats(d, c, sizeof(c) / sizeof(c[0]) );

    return 0;
}
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The use of _tmain() documents this as being restricted to Windows, presumably with the MSVC compiler. It won't work on the systems I use. –  Jonathan Leffler May 24 at 20:32
    
Why do you think that your non-portable assembly language implementation is faster than a C implementation? Have you measured it? –  Keith Thompson May 24 at 22:06
    
@JonathanLeffler, well you can always replace _tmain with main and _TCHAR with char. I copy pasted this from the test application to make sure it works. The assembly code is 32bit, it should be slightly updated in case you need it for x64 –  rkudinov May 25 at 21:45
    
And SPARC? And Power 8? And ARM? And ...? –  Jonathan Leffler May 25 at 21:49

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