Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

What is the correct way to pass a numpy 2d - array to a c function using ctypes ? My current approach so far (leads to a segfault):

c code :

void test(double **in_array, int N){
    int i,j;
        for(i = 0; i<N; i++){
            for(j = 0; j<N; j++){
                printf("%e \t", in_array[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

python code:

from ctypes import *
import numpy.ctypeslib as npct

array_2d_double = npct.ndpointer(dtype=np.double,ndim=2, flags='CONTIGUOUS')
liblr = npct.load_library('libtest.so', './src')

liblr.test.restype = None
liblr.test.argtypes = [array_2d_double, c_int]

x = np.arange(100).reshape((10,10)).astype(np.double)
liblr.test(x, 10)
share|improve this question
    
You do know that double ** and double [N][N] are not interchangeable in C, don't you? – Filipe Gonçalves Mar 15 '14 at 15:48
    
my problem is that I work with double ** in my c- code is there some solution to this ? – jrsm Mar 15 '14 at 15:49
    
Well, I don't know python nor numpy, but if it's an NxN array, you should declare in_array as double (*in_array)[N], where N is the size of the second dimension. – Filipe Gonçalves Mar 15 '14 at 15:53
    
How does this work if N is not fixed at runtime ? – jrsm Mar 15 '14 at 16:09
    
I think you mean if it's not fixed at compile time. In that case, if you have a C99 compiler supporting VLAs, you could declare test as void test(int width, double in_array[][width]), but I doubt that this will work with numpy. Maybe you'd better wait for someone who is familiar with it, I really have no idea if you can do it with numpy. – Filipe Gonçalves Mar 15 '14 at 16:23
up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is probably a late answer, but I finally got it working. All credit goes to Sturla Molden at this link.

The key is, note that double** is an array of type np.uintp. Therefore, we have

xpp = (x.ctypes.data + np.arange(x.shape[0]) * x.strides[0]).astype(np.uintp)
doublepp = np.ctypeslib.ndpointer(dtype=np.uintp)

And then use doublepp as the type, pass xpp in. See full code attached.

The C code:

// dummy.c 
#include <stdlib.h> 

__declspec(dllexport) void foobar(const int m, const int n, const 
double **x, double **y) 
{ 
    size_t i, j; 
    for(i=0; i<m; i++) 
        for(j=0; j<n; j++) 
            y[i][j] = x[i][j]; 
} 

The Python code:

# test.py 
import numpy as np 
from numpy.ctypeslib import ndpointer 
import ctypes 

_doublepp = ndpointer(dtype=np.uintp, ndim=1, flags='C') 

_dll = ctypes.CDLL('dummy.dll') 

_foobar = _dll.foobar 
_foobar.argtypes = [ctypes.c_int, ctypes.c_int, _doublepp, _doublepp] 
_foobar.restype = None 

def foobar(x): 
    y = np.zeros_like(x) 
    xpp = (x.__array_interface__['data'][0] 
      + np.arange(x.shape[0])*x.strides[0]).astype(np.uintp) 
    ypp = (y.__array_interface__['data'][0] 
      + np.arange(y.shape[0])*y.strides[0]).astype(np.uintp) 
    m = ctypes.c_int(x.shape[0]) 
    n = ctypes.c_int(x.shape[1]) 
    _foobar(m, n, xpp, ypp) 
    return y 

if __name__ == '__main__': 
    x = np.arange(9.).reshape((3, 3)) 
    y = foobar(x) 

Hope it helps,

Shawn

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this. However I don't really understand what is happening here. How does this extend to 3d and beyond? – navjotk Mar 26 at 4:54
#include <stdio.h>

void test(double (*in_array)[3], int N){
    int i, j;

    for(i = 0; i < N; i++){
        for(j = 0; j < N; j++){
            printf("%e \t", in_array[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    double a[][3] = {
        {1., 2., 3.},
        {4., 5., 6.},
        {7., 8., 9.},
    };

    test(a, 3);
    return 0;
}

if you want to use a double ** in your function, you must pass an array of pointer to double (not a 2d array):

#include <stdio.h>

void test(double **in_array, int N){
    int i, j;

    for(i = 0; i < N; i++){
        for(j = 0; j< N; j++){
            printf("%e \t", in_array[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    double a[][3] = {
        {1., 2., 3.},
        {4., 5., 6.},
        {7., 8., 9.},
    };
    double *p[] = {a[0], a[1], a[2]};

    test(p, 3);
    return 0;
}

Another (as suggested by @eryksun): pass a single pointer and do some arithmetic to get the index:

#include <stdio.h>

void test(double *in_array, int N){
    int i, j;

    for(i = 0; i < N; i++){
        for(j = 0; j< N; j++){
            printf("%e \t", in_array[i * N + j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    double a[][3] = {
        {1., 2., 3.},
        {4., 5., 6.},
        {7., 8., 9.},
    };

    test(a[0], 3);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about the ctypes code? – David Heffernan Mar 15 '14 at 16:33
    
@DavidHeffernan, I don't know about the ctypes code part, I'm trying to explain why double ** isn't working when a 2d array is passed – Alter Mann Mar 15 '14 at 16:39
    
The problem is that N is not fixed at runtime – jrsm Mar 15 '14 at 17:14
    
@eryksun, good point, added to the answer – Alter Mann Mar 15 '14 at 17:39
    
@jrsm: if you really want the double ** approach, you can create the array of pointers like this: c_double_p = POINTER(c_double); in_array_ptrs = (c_double_p * len(in_array))(*(r.ctypes.data_as(c_double_p) for r in in_array)). I don't recommend this since it's inefficient. – eryksun Mar 15 '14 at 19:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.