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I've been trying to solve this problem in my small code of encrypting and decrypting using RSA algorithm, some characters like y,z,x which returns 'X' when I try to decrypt them, and letters that give another characters like 'f' that gives 'e' and 'p' returns 'o'

Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

void main()
{
    char msg[255];
    char crp[255], decrp[255];
    int p = 3, q = 11, n = p * q, e = 7, d = 3, addition = 96;
    int i = 0, k = 0;

    printf("your message: ");
    scanf("%s", &msg);

    while (msg[i] != '\0')
    {
        k = pow(msg[i] - addition, e);
        crp[i] = k % n + addition;
        i++;
    }
    crp[i] = '\0';
    printf("\nyour encrypted msg is:  %s", crp);

    i = 0;
    while (crp[i] != '\0')
    {
        k = pow(crp[i] - addition, d);
        decrp[i] = k % n + addition;
        i++;
    }

    decrp[i] = '\0';
    printf("\nyour decrypted msg is:  %s", decrp);
}

P.S: I don't know why but without adding the number 'addition' which is 96 is doesn't work, I saw it in some example but couldn't understand it.

And when I change the values of p,q,n,e,d the code doesn't work though I calculated them well.

Here's the output of the whole alphabet:

input:

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

output:

your encrypted msg is:  a}ipn~|bojklgt{yhfmzu^^^^^
your decrypted msg is:  abcdeeghijklmnooqrsttXXXXX
share|improve this question
    
You had better be running on Windows; otherwise, void main() is undefined behaviour. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 15 '14 at 18:37
    
Is "Egyptology" slang term here? –  modchan Mar 22 '14 at 4:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The correct value of 267 is 8031810176, which is too large to fit into a 32-bit integer.

I would worry about the accuracy of pow(), though it is probably OK for the values you're dealing with. However, it is fairly straight-forward to write an integer power function, so I did and used it in place of the one from the <math.h> library.

The code still mishandles characters other than the lower-case alphabet; you should address that. It also generates numbers outside the range of the alphabet — witness the punctuation shown in the sample output:

your plaintext msg is:  abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

your encrypted msg is:  a}ipn~|bojklgt{yhfmzuvwre

your decrypted msg is:  abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Note that the encrypted message appears shorter than the input and decrypted messages. When run through a program that makes non-printable characters visible as C hex escapes, the output is:

your plaintext msg is:  abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

your encrypted msg is:  a}ipn~|bojklgt{yhfmzuvwr\x7Fe

your decrypted msg is:  abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Anyway, this is your code somewhat fixed, and at least producing a round trip for the lower-case alphabet:

#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdio.h>

static int64_t ipow(int64_t x, int64_t n)
{
    int64_t m = x;
    int64_t r = 1;
    while (n > 0)
    {
        if (n & 1)
            r *= m;
        m *= m;
        n /= 2;
    }
    return r;
}

int main(void)
{
    char msg[255];
    char crp[255], decrp[255];
    const int64_t p = 3, q = 11, n = p * q, e = 7, d = 3;
    const int addition = 'a' - 1;
    int i = 0;
    int64_t k = 0;

    printf("your message: ");
    if (scanf("%s", msg) != 1)
        return 1;
    printf("\nyour plaintext msg is:  %s\n", msg);

    for (i = 0; msg[i] != '\0'; i++)
    {
        k = ipow(msg[i] - addition, e);
        crp[i] = k % n + addition;
    }
    crp[i] = '\0';
    printf("\nyour encrypted msg is:  %s\n", crp);

    for (i = 0; crp[i] != '\0'; i++)
    {
        k = ipow(crp[i] - addition, d);
        decrp[i] = k % n + addition;
    }
    decrp[i] = '\0';
    printf("\nyour decrypted msg is:  %s\n", decrp);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean by "and at least producing a round trip for the lower-case alphabet" !!? –  Mohe TheDreamy Mar 15 '14 at 19:35
1  
A 'round trip' in the 'real world' means you travel from Point A to Point B and back again. In this context, it means that conversion from plain text to encrypted text and then from encrypted text back to plain (decrypted) text leaves you with the same information as you started with. If this were a serious encryption algorithm, we'd be worried about the fact that letters 'a', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'u', 'v', 'w' are all encrypted to themselves; it means that the message is not well concealed because more than one quarter of the characters aren't changed by being encrypted. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 15 '14 at 19:42
    
should I worry about that ? I mean it's a school project and the teacher asked me to encrypt text using RSA Algorithm, I looked for RSA Algorithm and this is all, I think I'm doing right (except that I didn't use large values for 'p' and 'q') talking about that, I tried larger values but it didn't work, I assume it's probably because I need a larger variables ? –  Mohe TheDreamy Mar 15 '14 at 20:15
    
I've not been and checked whether there are any problems (other than sheer lack of size) in the numbers you're using; I would have to look up the tests to be made. However, any encryption scheme that effectively didn't encrypt a quarter of the text would be useless in the real world. If the values of p and q were given to you, then there's not much to worry about (but you could calculate some alternative values of e and d and see whether any of those work any better). If e and d were given as well, there's nothing to worry about. If you were allowed to choose all the values, then … try again? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 15 '14 at 20:21

You are overflowing the value for k because the result of pow() is too large for an int. Trying store a floating point number that is too large for the integer is undefined, according to the C99 standard, section 6.3.1.4.

When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined.

Use a 64-bit integer for k, to fix this problem.

int64_t k=0; 

Include <stdint.h> to get the definition for int64_t.

share|improve this answer
    
how about defining 'k' as 'double' ? because I tried it and there were some problems.. –  Mohe TheDreamy Mar 15 '14 at 19:23
1  
If you define k as a double, you have a problem with evaluating the k % n because both arguments to % must be integers. You'd have to use the fmod() function instead. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 15 '14 at 19:26
Dear Friend here is a code that implements RSA.

go through it

/*Arpana*/

#include<stdio.h> 
#include<conio.h> 
#include<stdlib.h> 
#include<math.h> 
#include<string.h> 

long int p,q,n,t,flag,e[100],d[100],temp[100],j,m[100],en[100],i; 
char msg[100]; 
int prime(long int); 
void ce(); 
long int cd(long int); 
void encrypt(); 
void decrypt(); 
void main() 
{ 
clrscr(); 
printf("\nENTER FIRST PRIME NUMBER\n"); 
scanf("%d",&p); 
flag=prime(p); 
if(flag==0) 
{ 
    printf("\nWRONG INPUT\n"); 
    getch(); 
    exit(1); 
} 
printf("\nENTER ANOTHER PRIME NUMBER\n"); 
scanf("%d",&q); 
flag=prime(q); 
if(flag==0||p==q) 
{ 
    printf("\nWRONG INPUT\n"); 
    getch(); 
    exit(1); 
} 
printf("\nENTER MESSAGE\n"); 
fflush(stdin); 
scanf("%s",msg); 
for(i=0;msg[i]!=NULL;i++) 
m[i]=msg[i]; 
n=p*q; 
t=(p-1)*(q-1); 
ce(); 
printf("\nPOSSIBLE VALUES OF e AND d ARE\n"); 
for(i=0;i<j-1;i++) 
printf("\n%ld\t%ld",e[i],d[i]); 
encrypt(); 
decrypt(); 
getch(); 
} 
int prime(long int pr) 
{ 
int i; 
j=sqrt(pr); 
for(i=2;i<=j;i++) 
{ 
    if(pr%i==0) 
    return 0; 
} 
return 1; 
} 
void ce() 
{ 
int k; 
k=0; 
for(i=2;i<t;i++) 
{ 
    if(t%i==0) 
    continue; 
    flag=prime(i); 
    if(flag==1&&i!=p&&i!=q) 
    { 
        e[k]=i; 
        flag=cd(e[k]); 
        if(flag>0) 
        { 
            d[k]=flag; 
            k++; 
        } 
        if(k==99) 
        break; 
    } 
} 
} 
long int cd(long int x) 
{ 
long int k=1; 
while(1) 
{ 
    k=k+t; 
    if(k%x==0) 
    return(k/x); 
} 
} 
void encrypt() 
{ 
long int pt,ct,key=e[0],k,len; 
i=0; 
len=strlen(msg); 
while(i!=len) 
{ 
    pt=m[i]; 
    pt=pt-96; 
    k=1; 
    for(j=0;j<key;j++) 
    { 
        k=k*pt; 
        k=k%n; 
    } 
    temp[i]=k; 
    ct=k+96; 
    en[i]=ct; 
    i++; 
} 
en[i]=-1; 
printf("\nTHE ENCRYPTED MESSAGE IS\n"); 
for(i=0;en[i]!=-1;i++) 
printf("%c",en[i]); 
} 
void decrypt() 
{ 
long int pt,ct,key=d[0],k; 
i=0; 
while(en[i]!=-1) 
{ 
    ct=temp[i]; 
    k=1; 
    for(j=0;j<key;j++) 
    { 
        k=k*ct; 
        k=k%n; 
    } 
    pt=k+96; 
    m[i]=pt; 
    i++; 
} 
m[i]=-1; 
printf("\nTHE DECRYPTED MESSAGE IS\n"); 
for(i=0;m[i]!=-1;i++) 
printf("%c",m[i]); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
already seen that code, it makes no sense at all. and what's this temp[] ? –  Mohe TheDreamy Mar 22 '14 at 11:22

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