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When instantiating Thread to create a thread object by implementing Runnable interface, we do something like

public class HelloRunnable implements Runnable {

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Hello from a thread!");
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        (new Thread(new HelloRunnable())).start();
    }

}

Reference:Tutorial

The question is from the line in the main() method. I understand that start() is an instance method of the class Thread, and that is why we are using (the newly created object of the class Thread with) the dot notation.

Now my question is about the creation of this Thread object (created by new Thread(new HelloRunnable()) ). Why are we passing an object of HelloRunnable (i.e. the class implementing the run() of the Runnable interface) to the constructor if Thread. What does the Thread() constructor need an object of HelloRunnable for? What use will the Thread() constructor make of HelloRunnable object?

In general, a Thread() constructor's job is to create a Thread object. So where does the Thread() constructor use the 'object of the class implementing run()' while creating an object of the class Thread.

Thank you in advance.

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1  
Did you check out the Thread documentation? docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Thread.html –  Jon Skeet Mar 16 '14 at 8:12
    
@JonSkeet Yes, I did. I actually mean to ask that the job of the constructor is not to ensure that the class has something to run. It's job is to assign some values(passed to it in the constructor call) to the fields of the newly-created/being-created object. Isn't it? –  Zarah Mar 16 '14 at 17:43
1  
In this case, those are the same thing - the value that you're passing is "the thing to run". Passing a Runnable to Thread is cleaner than extending Thread directly, because we're not changing the threading behaviour - we're just trying to say "run this code in a new thread". –  Jon Skeet Mar 16 '14 at 17:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To find out what a constructor in the Java API does, read the javadoc (in any good IDE, you can simply hover the mouse over new class instance creation expression to see a tooltip with the javadoc). For the Thread constructor taking a Runnable, it says:

Allocates a new Thread object. This constructor has the same effect as Thread (null, target, gname), where gname is a newly generated name. Automatically generated names are of the form "Thread-"+n, where n is an integer.

Parameters:

  • target - the object whose run method is invoked when this thread is started. If null, this classes run method does nothing.

So, the Runnable object provides the run method to invoke. If you don't pass such an object, the thread wouldn't know which class contains the run method (let alone how to initialize that object).

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I actually mean to ask that the job of the constructor is not to ensure that the class has something to run. It's job is to assign some values(passed to it in the constructor call) to the fields of the newly-created/being-created object. Isn't it? –  Zarah Mar 16 '14 at 17:34

The 'object of the class implementing run' is necessary so that there's something to run.

Otherwise, what code would run in the thread?

You don't strictly need a Runnable object - the alternative is to extend Thread instead and override Thread's run method.

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I actually mean to ask that the job of the constructor is not to ensure that the class has something to run. It's job is to assign some values(passed to it in the constructor call) to the fields of the newly-created/being-created object. Isn't it? –  Zarah Mar 16 '14 at 17:34

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