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I want to tar, compress with xz and then encrypt symmetrically with gpg using a key file. I could to this with a for loop, but would rather like to do it by piping.

I tried the following, but it didn't work because of "Ambiguous input redirect":

tar cvf /home/user/backupdir | xz -1 | gpg -c --batch --passphrase-fd 0 --yes --symmetric --cipher-algo TWOFISH --digest-algo SHA512 -o backupdir.tar.xz.gpg < keyfile

Could someone help me maybe out with that, encryption and decryption by piping?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
your tar does not support the --xz option? – Henno Brandsma Mar 16 '14 at 10:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are basically doing:

tar | xz | gpg <file

In this chain you tell gpg to get input both from file and from the previous command.

There is only one STDIN you cannot read from two sources.

The man page gives a few solutions:

   --passphrase-fd n
          Read the passphrase from file descriptor n. Only the first line will
          be  read  from file descriptor n. If you use 0 for n, the passphrase
          will be read  from  STDIN.  This  can  only  be  used  if  only  one
          passphrase  is  supplied.  Note that this passphrase is only used if
          the option --batch has also been given.  This is different from gpg.

   --passphrase-file file
          Read the passphrase from file file. Only the first line will be read
          from file file. This can only be used if only one passphrase is sup‐
          plied. Obviously, a passphrase stored in a file is  of  questionable
          security if other users can read this file. Don't use this option if
          you can avoid it.  Note that this passphrase is  only  used  if  the
          option --batch has also been given.  This is different from gpg.

   --passphrase string
          Use  string  as  the  passphrase.  This can only be used if only one
          passphrase is supplied. Obviously,  this  is  of  very  questionable
          security  on  a  multi-user system. Don't use this option if you can
          avoid it.  Note that this passphrase is  only  used  if  the  option
          --batch has also been given.  This is different from gpg.

Since you already have the passphrase in a file, the second option looks good for you.

If the second option is not available or not working at your gpg version, you can use the first option instead:

gpg --passphrase-fd 3 3<keyfile

In this case gpg will get the data on STDIN and the keyfile on file descriptor 3.

share|improve this answer

gpg gets its encrypted data from stdin, in your case, but you also specify that the passphrase comes from stdin, by --passphrase-fd 0. This will confuse gpg.

Maybe cat the keyfile to another file-descriptor (say 3), using cat keyfile > &3 at the beginning, and use --passphrase-fd 3 instead.

share|improve this answer
    
You could do gpg --passphrase-fd 3 3<keyfile but gpg --passphrase-file keyfile is probably the easier way. – michas Mar 16 '14 at 11:10
    
The online man page didn't mention the --passphrase-file option, hence the workaround. – Henno Brandsma Mar 16 '14 at 11:21

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