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Hi i am trying to calculate difference of two dates in days. The dates are 14 of this month and today. It should be 2. But o/p is 0 always. Code:

    long today = (new java.util.Date().getTime());
    long difference =(long) (today - 1394809789186.0);
    long daysdifference = difference/(24*3600*1000);
    System.out.println(daysdifference);

o/p: 0.

whats wrong?

Now i did another trick and it gives perfect answer dont know whats wrong with above code...

   SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.mm.yyyy"); 
    long firstdateseconds = df.parse("14.03.2014").getTime();
    long today = df.parse("16.03.2014").getTime();
    long difference = (today-firstdateseconds);
    long days = (long)(difference/(24*3600*1000));
    System.out.println(days);

o/p : 2 // now correct bingo!

Guys whats happening?

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1  
You should try printing out intermediate values to see what's going on. Also, what is the magic number 1394809789186.0? –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 16 '14 at 15:19
    
@oli: it's a millisecond timestamp that corresponds to Mar 14th. –  Marc B Mar 16 '14 at 15:19
    
@MarcB: Yeah, I assumed that ;) But I'm wondering why the OP has that hardcoded, rather than simply explicitly constructing it as such. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 16 '14 at 15:21
1  
Probably caused by dividing difference by an int. –  Daniël Knippers Mar 16 '14 at 15:23
3  
If you used the Joda-Time API, you would never have to worry about such calculations. –  Tiny Mar 16 '14 at 15:39

3 Answers 3

Use double you are crossing a truncation issue

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Use double for what? –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 16 '14 at 15:19
    
Now did this: long today = (new java.util.Date().getTime()); double difference =(double) (today - 1394809789186.0); double daysdifference = difference/(24*3600*1000); o/p : 0.008885162037037037 –  Deepsthecoder Mar 16 '14 at 15:23
    
When i use long it says number too long in netbeans.. so used double –  Deepsthecoder Mar 16 '14 at 15:24
    
Because there is a division and it truncates to 0 if one day is not elapsed. –  venergiac Mar 16 '14 at 17:54

I used the following simple code to accomplish what you want:

import java.util.Date;

public class datediff {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Date d1 = new Date();
        Date d2 = new Date(2014 - 1900, 2, 14);
        long d1_millis = d1.getTime();
        long d2_millis = d2.getTime();
        long diffMillis = d1_millis - d2_millis;
        long diffDays = diffMillis / (24 * 3600 * 1000);
        System.out.println("Difference in days: " + diffDays);

    }
}

OUTPUT:

Difference in days: 2


Also note that the magic number that you are using while calculating the difference is incorrect.

The actual value to subtract is : 1394735400000

That is the most dangerous disadvantage of using magic numbers.

Hope that clarifies things for you.

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Please check the ranges of the inputs to the Date constructor in the Javadoc... –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 16 '14 at 15:35
    
@OliCharlesworth: Corrected my code. –  Crystal Meth Mar 16 '14 at 15:47
    
The o/p is still 0; –  Deepsthecoder Mar 16 '14 at 16:11
    
I have simplified the code and also given the output. –  Crystal Meth Mar 16 '14 at 16:16

Perhaps a combined TimeZone and "Time (hours/minutes/seconds)" issue?

Case I

Different timezones and different day times:

 public static void main(final String[] args) {

    final Calendar march14 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("US/Hawaii"));
    march14.set(2014, Calendar.MARCH, 14, 23, 59, 0);

    final Calendar march16 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("Asia/Tokyo"));
    march16.set(2014, Calendar.MARCH, 16, 0, 0, 0);

    final long diffInMs = march16.getTimeInMillis() - march14.getTimeInMillis();
    System.out.println("diff = " + diffInMs / (24 * 3600 * 1000)+" day(s)");

}

This prints:

diff = 0 day(s)

Case II

However, adjusting the time zone:

public static void main(final String[] args) {

    final Calendar march14 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("US/Hawaii"));
    march14.set(2014, Calendar.MARCH, 14, 23, 59, 0);

    final Calendar march16 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("US/Hawaii")); // <- CHANGE!
    march16.set(2014, Calendar.MARCH, 16, 0, 0, 0);

    final long diffInMs = march16.getTimeInMillis() - march14.getTimeInMillis();
    System.out.println("diff = " + diffInMs / (24 * 3600 * 1000)+" day(s)");

}

This prints:

diff = 1 day(s)

Case III

And adjusting the time (hours/minutes/seconds):

public static void main(final String[] args) {

    final Calendar march14 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("US/Hawaii"));
    march14.set(2014, Calendar.MARCH, 14, 0, 0, 0);  // <- CHANGE!

    final Calendar march16 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("US/Hawaii"));
    march16.set(2014, Calendar.MARCH, 16, 0, 0, 0);

    final long diffInMs = march16.getTimeInMillis() - march14.getTimeInMillis();
    System.out.println("diff = " + diffInMs / (24 * 3600 * 1000)+" day(s)");

}

This prints:

diff = 2 day(s)

Conclusions

My two advices:

  • Don't use magic numbers, set all parts of your date/calendar objects that are relevant
  • Always set the TimeZone when working with date/time

Additional note to SimpleDateFormat

By the way: In SimpleDateFormat m is for minutes, M for month in year, see http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/text/SimpleDateFormat.html. It was pure random that the result of your calculations was 2.

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