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I have this weird problem happening I am downloading a a file using a wget, then set a var as first line of file, then comparing to string to verify the file. Weird thing is var is set as expected, echo works fien but when I use if to compare, var blows up. Look at example below:

set /p first_line=< c:\data.dsv
echo %first_line%
if %first_line% == SomefirstLine GOTO Success

When batch runs, echo gives correct var value, but in if it give first 3 lines, why is this weird thing happening?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason is probably the line termination in the downloaded file. If lines end with 0x0A (linefeed) without a 0x0D (carriage return), the set /p will read until the first 0x0D, end of file or max length is retrieved.

echo command will output until the first 0x0A, but the variable contents are the three "lines", and it can be verified using set first_line to see the real content of the variable.

You can use

set "first_line="
for /f "delims=" %%a in (c:\data.dsv) do set "first_line=%%a" & goto done
:done

Or if you prefer to read the file with the set /p method, then do that same processing on the retrieved variable to extract the required value

set /p first_line=< c:\data.dsv
set "first_first_line="
for /f "delims=" %%a in ("%first_line%"
) do if not defined first_first_line set "first_fisrt_line=%%a"

EDITED - It seems the OS versions affects the way it works.

The second proposed code was tested in a machine with XP and it worked, but in windows 7 it does not work. Once tested, the for command, instead of splitting the string on the 0x0A character, removes the 0x0A and the three lines are joined into one that is assigned to the variable. So, only the first option (with just the for loop) works on both versions.

Option 3 - To avoid reading the full file into memory, the output of the set command can be parsed to retrieve the real first line.

@echo off

:: get data
    set /p "first_line="<c:\data.dsv

:: show data
    echo(data retrieved with set /p
    echo(----------------------------------------------------
    echo(%first_line%
    echo(----------------------------------------------------
    set first_line
    echo(----------------------------------------------------
    echo(

:: get data 2
    for /f "tokens=1,* delims==" %%a in ('set first_line^|find "first_line="') do set "first_line=%%b"

:: show data
    echo(data retrieved with for
    echo(----------------------------------------------------
    echo(%first_line%
    echo(----------------------------------------------------
    set first_line
    echo(----------------------------------------------------

:: test data    
    set "SomeFirstLine=...."
    if "%first_line%"=="SomeFirstLine" GOTO Success
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Thanks for quick reply, but will this for go over whole flat file, I have like 1.5 million records in there, that will be so much wastage of resources, time. I am a newbie and learning, let me know if I am wrong –  fdk2dublin Mar 16 at 16:43
    
@fdk2dublin, in the first code block, all the file is read into memory, but only the first line is processed. The second block of code uses the same set /p you were using, and then the retrieved data is splitted using a for command. In your case, the second approach is probably better. –  MC ND Mar 16 at 18:46
    
Thanks MC ND, I am trying to use the second code snippet(for /f), but the length still tries to interfere & will not execute the and set the first_first_line, any help is appreciated in advance. or if there is any other quick way to fix this –  fdk2dublin Mar 16 at 19:40
    
@fdk2dublin, please see updated answer. It seems parser changes its behaviour with the os version. –  MC ND Mar 17 at 7:18
    
@fdk2dublin, i've included a third option to avoid reading the full file into memory. Anyway, from recent tests with for command, i got a 280MB file loaded into memory in 0.11 second, and with the first approach it is discarded after the first line is processed. I don't know what is your volume of data, but if it is not really big maybe the single for command solves the problem. –  MC ND Mar 17 at 7:37

Note the double quotes in the if compare - they protect it from spaces and & characters.

set /p first_line=< c:\data.dsv
echo %first_line%
if "%first_line%" == "SomefirstLine" GOTO Success
share|improve this answer
    
@foxDrive, i tried this before, but case is what MC ND has mentioned. I can make this thing work using the first method mentioned by MC ND, not sure why second approach (by MC ND)is not working. –  fdk2dublin Mar 17 at 3:25
    
Do you have spaces, & % or other poison characters in the string? It's not the case that is the problem. –  foxidrive Mar 17 at 3:28

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