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Looking for a function in R to convert dates into week numbers (of year) I went for week from package data.table. However, I observed some strange behaviour:

> week("2014-03-16") # Sun, expecting 11
[1] 11
> week("2014-03-17") # Mon, expecting 12
[1] 11
> week("2014-03-18") # Tue, expecting 12
[1] 12

Why is the week number switching to 12 on tuesday, instead of monday? What am I missing? (Timezone should be irrelevant as there are just dates?!)

Other suggestions for (base) R functions are appreciated as well.

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2  
Try format(as.Date("2014-03-16"), "%U") or format(as.Date("2014-03-16"), "%W") –  GSee Mar 16 '14 at 16:54
    
@GSee thanks, but that returns 11 instead 12 for the following: format(as.Date("2014-03-17"), "%U") and format(as.Date("2014-03-17"), "%W") !? –  Christian Borck Mar 16 '14 at 17:07
    
so, convert to integer and add 1. See ?strptime –  GSee Mar 16 '14 at 19:21
    
That's what I am doing right now, actually. I was just wondering, why I have to make this workaround? I would expect the week to begin on monday (EU) or sunday (US), but not on tuesday? –  Christian Borck Mar 16 '14 at 19:27

4 Answers 4

Actually, I think you may have discovered a bug in the week(...) function, or at least an error in the documentation. Hopefully someone will jump in and explain why I am wrong.

Looking at the code:

library(lubridate)
> week
function (x) 
yday(x)%/%7 + 1
<environment: namespace:lubridate>

The documentation states:

Weeks is the number of complete seven day periods that have occured between the date and January 1st, plus one.

But since Jan 1 is the first day of the year (not the zeroth), the first "week" will be a six day period. The code should (??) be

(yday(x)-1)%/%7 + 1

NB: You are using week(...) in the data.table package, which is the same code as lubridate::week except it coerces everything to integer rather than numeric for efficiency. So this function has the same problem (??).

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if you try with lubridate:

library(lubridate)
lubridate::week(ymd("2014-03-16", "2014-03-17","2014-03-18", '2014-01-01'))

[1] 11 11 12  1

The pattern is the same. Try isoweek

lubridate::isoweek(ymd("2014-03-16", "2014-03-17","2014-03-18", '2014-01-01'))
[1] 11 12 12  1
share|improve this answer
    
?week (lubridate) states: Weeks is the number of complete seven day periods that have occured between the date and January 1st, plus one. –  Christian Borck Mar 16 '14 at 16:44
    
@ChristianBorck isoweek is what you need? –  Paulo Cardoso Mar 16 '14 at 16:51
    
That looks good, but my lubridate (v 1.3.1) package seems to be missing the isoweek function? Which version do you use? –  Christian Borck Mar 16 '14 at 16:57
    
@ChristianBorck I'm running lubridate_1.3.3 update it. –  Paulo Cardoso Mar 16 '14 at 16:58
    
Thanks, it works now! –  Christian Borck Mar 16 '14 at 17:03

I think the problem is that the week calculation somehow uses the first day of the year. I don't understand the internal mechanics, but you can see what I mean with this example:

library(data.table)

dd <- seq(as.IDate("2013-12-20"), as.IDate("2014-01-20"), 1)
# dd <- seq(as.IDate("2013-12-01"), as.IDate("2014-03-31"), 1)

dt <- data.table(i = 1:length(dd),
                 day = dd,
                 weekday = weekdays(dd),
                 day_rounded = round(dd, "weeks"))
## Now let's add the weekdays for the "rounded" date
dt[ , weekday_rounded := weekdays(day_rounded)]
## This seems to make internal sense with the "week" calculation
dt[ , weeknumber := week(day)]
dt 

    i        day   weekday day_rounded weekday_rounded weeknumber
1:  1 2013-12-20    Friday  2013-12-17         Tuesday         51
2:  2 2013-12-21  Saturday  2013-12-17         Tuesday         51
3:  3 2013-12-22    Sunday  2013-12-17         Tuesday         51
4:  4 2013-12-23    Monday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
5:  5 2013-12-24   Tuesday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
6:  6 2013-12-25 Wednesday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
7:  7 2013-12-26  Thursday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
8:  8 2013-12-27    Friday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
9:  9 2013-12-28  Saturday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
10: 10 2013-12-29    Sunday  2013-12-24         Tuesday         52
11: 11 2013-12-30    Monday  2013-12-31         Tuesday         53
12: 12 2013-12-31   Tuesday  2013-12-31         Tuesday         53
13: 13 2014-01-01 Wednesday  2014-01-01       Wednesday          1
14: 14 2014-01-02  Thursday  2014-01-01       Wednesday          1
15: 15 2014-01-03    Friday  2014-01-01       Wednesday          1
16: 16 2014-01-04  Saturday  2014-01-01       Wednesday          1
17: 17 2014-01-05    Sunday  2014-01-01       Wednesday          1
18: 18 2014-01-06    Monday  2014-01-01       Wednesday          1
19: 19 2014-01-07   Tuesday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
20: 20 2014-01-08 Wednesday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
21: 21 2014-01-09  Thursday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
22: 22 2014-01-10    Friday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
23: 23 2014-01-11  Saturday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
24: 24 2014-01-12    Sunday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
25: 25 2014-01-13    Monday  2014-01-08       Wednesday          2
26: 26 2014-01-14   Tuesday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
27: 27 2014-01-15 Wednesday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
28: 28 2014-01-16  Thursday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
29: 29 2014-01-17    Friday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
30: 30 2014-01-18  Saturday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
31: 31 2014-01-19    Sunday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
32: 32 2014-01-20    Monday  2014-01-15       Wednesday          3
     i        day   weekday day_rounded weekday_rounded weeknumber

My workaround is this function: https://github.com/geneorama/geneorama/blob/master/R/round_weeks.R

round_weeks <- function(x){
    require(data.table)
    dt <- data.table(i = 1:length(x),
                     day = x,
                     weekday = weekdays(x))
    offset <- data.table(weekday = c('Sunday', 'Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 
                                     'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday'),
                         offset = -(0:6))
    dt <- merge(dt, offset, by="weekday")
    dt[ , day_adj := day + offset]
    setkey(dt, i)
    return(dt[ , day_adj])
}

Of course, you can easily change the offset to make Monday first or whatever. The best way to do this would be to add an offset to the offset... but I haven't done that yet.

I provided a link to my simple geneorama package, but please don't rely on it too much because it's likely to change and not very documented.

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I understand the need for packages in certain situations, but the base language is so elegant and so proven (and debugged and optimized).

Why not:

dt <- as.Date("2014-03-16")

dt2 <- as.POSIXlt(dt)

dt2$yday

[1] 74

And then your choice whether the first week of the year is zero (as in indexing in C) or 1 (as in indexing in R).

No packages to learn, update, worry about bugs in.

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I always try to solve problems with base R first. So, I am with you. But your answer misses to get the (calendar) week number I am looking for!? (dt2$yday-1)%/%7 +1 for example only works right, if January 1st was a monday. –  Christian Borck Mar 16 '14 at 18:42
2  
@ChristianBorck - Not to confuse things even further, but "right" depends on your definition of "week". The ISO-8601 standard defines a week to start on a Monday, although the week numbering depends on what day Jan 1 falls on. The week(...) function does not claim to use this standard. My point was that week(...) does not a appear to adhere to it's own definition. If you want ISO-8601 weeks (a good practice, by the way), use isoweek(...). –  jlhoward Mar 16 '14 at 19:28

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